White goods responsibility

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    White goods responsibility

    Hi Friends,

    Hope you are all fine and safe. I just want to know if we rent the residential property to the family, when we provide the white goods(Boiler, washing machine, freeze, freezer,,oven, NEST control) to the tenant, if any issues come whose responsibility to repair the same.
    Does it matter like it would be landlord's responsibility up till first 6months of the contract and after months it is tenant responsibility or is it completely landlord responsibility no matter tenant has stayed 2 yrs or three years.
    It it is landlord's responsibility how can it be as tenant will be using roughly and it should be there responsibility.
    Please can you kindly let me know regarding the same.
    Regards
    Stuart

    #2
    If you don't want to be responsible for repairing the white goods, it would probably be best to specifically contract out of it in the tenancy agreement.

    Comment


      #3
      Generally Iif you own it it is your responsibility- that is why I don’t supply white goods.

      By the way, a boiler is not ‘white goods’ and is always the LLs responsibility including annual gas safety check and certificate.

      Comment


        #4
        As above, you should make the situation clear in the tenancy agreement.

        As it happens, I generally supply a fridge/freezer and washing machine and repair/replace both, taking the view that it's part of what the tenant rents from me.

        But that's a choice I make, and there are no rules about it - other than if it's advertised with white goods, the tenant can reasonably expect them to be present and in good working order when they move in.
        No one can reasonably expect white goods to last forever and many landlords take the view that they follow the principle you'd apply to other non-everlasting items, (like light bulbs for example) - they're supplied working at the start of the tenancy but no one expects them to last forever and it's up to the tenant to replace them when they stop working.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment


          #5
          If you leave white goods in you'll have to have them PAT tested.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
            If you leave white goods in you'll have to have them PAT tested.
            While it's a good idea, PAT testing is only mandatory for HMOs in England.

            Landlords have an obligation that the property is safe - and it's difficult to know how else a landlord can show that they have done that should something go very wrong.
            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Not exactly what you asked but should you provide appliances?

              No – unless you…
              • …already have the appliances or have agreed with the (prospective) tenant to provide the appliances
              • …are willing to comply with The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016 and The Plugs and Sockets etc. (Safety) Regulations 1994 which includes checking the appliances, providing the tenant with the ‘required documents’ and arranging any periodic inspection and testing {electrical appliances}
              • …are willing to comply with General Product Safety Regulations 2005 {all appliances}
              • …are willing to comply with The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 {gas appliances}
              • …are willing to repair or replace the appliances when they become defective or beyond economical repair. Whilst landlords do not have a legal obligation to maintain an appliance connected to an installation (other than gas appliances as above), there is an ‘expectation’ amongst many tenants that as the appliance was supplied by the landlord, it should be repaired or replaced by the landlord. A special condition pointing this out can be added to the tenancy agreement but that may not alter the tenant’s expectations. Should the appliance need to be removed from the property at a later date (beyond repair, tenant replacing etc.), it would be unreasonable to expect the tenant to arrange and pay for the disposal. {non-gas appliances}
              • …make copies of the manuals available for the tenant

              Integrated appliances should always be left in the property.

              Under Section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 you must keep in repair and proper working order the installations in the dwelling-house for space heating and heating water.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                While it's a good idea, PAT testing is only mandatory for HMOs in England.

                Landlords have an obligation that the property is safe - and it's difficult to know how else a landlord can show that they have done that should something go very wrong.
                I thought it was for all elec items - all these years I've been getting the few elec items I've got in properties PAT testing! Well, you live and learn!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Its only mandatory in HMOs as a licensing condition too.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    According to Nottingham City Council Licensing Team PAT testing is only for 'portable' items - so large appliances (in my case fridge freezer & w. machine) did not need to be PAT tested.

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                      #11
                      Portable in that context means anything that can be removed so I believe large fridge freezers would count.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thankyou all. Yes Pat testing is for HMO landlords. Unfortunately the white goods we have provided , as couldn't take them as we already have, I have left them. But they all are brand new ones when provided. But everyone has different opinion, except gas I think what I understand it should be tenant responsibility as they would be using the same for one or two yrs or more.

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                          #13
                          My elec man told me today that everything needs PAT testing that has a plug on it with the exception of things that only use a tiny flow of elec e.g. bedroom aerials (he described it in more technical terms). But something that's wired directly into the mains doesn't need testing e.g. shower. 'Big ' things like washing machines, microwaves and fridges do.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thankyou for your kind reply.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
                              If you leave white goods in you'll have to have them PAT tested.
                              PAT testing advisable but not compulsory EICR and GAS are the priority

                              Comment

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