Landlord wont change 60 year old kitchen

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    Landlord wont change 60 year old kitchen

    I’m writing on behalf of my neighbour for some advice. She has been a tenant for over 60 years in the same property. She actually tried to buy it but the owner refused and said he didn’t want to sell. Anyhow, he actually sold the property to some one else not long after but the tenant stayed the same.The kitchen is the original kitchen and she has asked if it can now be upgraded. The landlord refused. Just said, no money for a kitchen. Is there anything she can do?

    #2
    If the landlord is a private individual (rather than a housing association) the tenancy is a particular type of protected tenancy.
    It gives the tenant a lot of protection and rights above newer tenancies, and will probably be subject to quite strict rent controls and be cheaper than other similar properties.

    If the property was sold, the chances are it was sold to an investor who trades off the low rent for the lower purchase price (these type of properties don't sell to many landlords because of the low rent) with the profit being made when the tenant eventually moves out or dies and the place is sold.

    But that doesn't incentivise the landlord to do anything more than what they're legally required to - they can be made to fix things that break, but the landlord won't want to spend money on a new kitchen or bathroom - they probably hope that the worse things get the more likely the tenant is to move out (which is what they probably want to happen).

    If the kitchen is unsafe or dangerous to health, the local authority can make the landlord do some maintenance, but I'd guess the landlord won't like that either (not that they can do much about it).
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      I wonder, if your neighbour does have an an old-style protected tenancy where the rent is significantly lower than current market rate, assuming that they want to stay put but that they also want a modern kitchen, would they be willing to pay for one themselves? I suppose this would involve negotiating with the landlord, but the landlord would probably not refuse if the tenant is offering to increase the value of their property.
      I do appreciate that this may not be possible, particularly if your neighbour is on a low/fixed income.

      Comment


        #4
        Ok.... to do the math on this, the tenant has been there for 60+ years,she moved in there at a reasonable age of say 20 years old........maybe, that would make her at a minimum, over 80 years of age ! I would not be fitting a new kitchen to someone's house at that age when i am in the latter part of my life ! That money would be going on enjoying what time i have. Let us all look to the ONS for the salutatory facts, the average life expectancy for a female now is 83 years old !!!

        Comment


          #5
          Perhaps she could get some quotes and then compare that to the rent she's paying. I think she might well be in for a shock.

          If the kitchen is in good repair it might be possible to paint the units to cheer them up a bit. There are some very good paints available these days.

          Some old kitchens are very nice and all the rage these days as vintage is the new modern.

          However, if she's got fibre board, MDF, or other absorbent units resting on the floor and the floor is original quarry tiles, I can imagine the units are beyond repair due to having absorbed moisture from the quarry tiles over the years.

          Comment


            #6
            Just remember it's not just a matter of fitting a new kitchen (even if the LL agrees), the old one needs to be taken out and new one fitted, plus and other things, flooring, walls, electrical points, which may take upto 2/4 weeks, these types of jobs are better done when empty rather when someone still resides in the property. What will the T do without a kitchen potentially for a month.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Hudson01 View Post
              Ok.... to do the math on this, the tenant has been there for 60+ years,she moved in there at a reasonable age of say 20 years old.......
              You can inherit this kind of tenancy, so the tenant may be as young as 60.
              Which is my age, and I'm not planning to die anytime soon.

              You also have to remember that the average life expectancy is just that, an average.
              Lots of people live well beyond the average.
              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                You can inherit this kind of tenancy, so the tenant may be as young as 60.
                Which is my age, and I'm not planning to die anytime soon.

                You also have to remember that the average life expectancy is just that, an average.
                Lots of people live well beyond the average.
                Well if the tenant is 60 which is really quite young ( jpkeates you owe me a drink ), then to replace the kitchen is , perhaps , a investment. You might get 20 or 25 years out of it.

                But if the tenant is 80 it's a different consideration. It's my observation that people at 80 can be ok, but they have declined considerably by 85. But that doesn't mean your elderly tenant has to have a rubbish kitchen.

                Edit : could you get a secondhand kitchen or an ex display?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Succession rights...

                  Could be a Joint regulated tenancy ?

                  There could be relatives living there who would have succession right to a Assured Tenancy, if they moved in After the 1988 Housing act came into force and been living there for more than two years.

                  Any relatives living there Before 1988 Housing act came into force and over 18, It would be one of these rare occasion they have succession right to a Regulated Tenancy.

                  Upon the death of a regulated tenant.

                  --------------------------------
                  Regulated tenants right to buy.

                  Have right to buy under certain circumstances

                  The right of 1st refusal-part 1 of landlord and tenants act 1987(as amended by housing act 1996)

                  https://assets.publishing.service.go...32/leaflet.pdf Page 54

                  What happens if the landlord wants to sell the
                  property?

                  A landlord who wishes to sell a property containing
                  flats must normally give the qualifying tenants the
                  opportunity to buy it. If the landlord fails to comply
                  with the first refusal procedure and sells to a third
                  party, he or she commits a criminal offence and may
                  be fined up to £5000. If the landlord sells his or her
                  interest in this way, the purchaser must inform the
                  tenants of his or her name and address, and serve a
                  notice on them saying that the right of first refusal may
                  apply. The tenants have the right to buy the property at
                  the price the purchaser paid. If the purchaser fails to do
                  either of these, he or she commits a criminal offence
                  and may be fined up to £2500. The time limit for the
                  tenant to exercise his or her right does not start until
                  he or she has been notified by the purchaser.
                  Thunderbirds are go

                  Comment


                    #10
                    How much are they paying now and what is the current open market rent for such a property?

                    https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/...article/2/made

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Without any repair for such amount of time the place must have become an emblem of unusual disrepair. Best would be to report to your local housing authority about this quasi - mini museum.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Self sufficient View Post
                        Without any repair for such amount of time the place must have become an emblem of unusual disrepair. Best would be to report to your local housing authority about this quasi - mini museum.
                        And do what exactly?
                        It's a tenancy prior to the Housing Act 1988.
                        Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by boletus View Post
                          How much are they paying now and what is the current open market rent for such a property?

                          https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/...article/2/made

                          If a LL carried out improvement work to a property of a regulated tenancy and applied for a rent increases afterwards.

                          The above url 1999 capping order allows for a maximum increase of 15% in rent on top of an existing fair rent registered under 1977 Rent act, s70.
                          Thunderbirds are go

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Welcome to the wonderful outcome of the state wanting to control what people can do with their property. You end up with a miserable world of 60 year old kitchens, lack of choice, and suction of money into the hands of state sponsored middlemen and lawyers (and at the extreme end of it, concentration camps).

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The new landlord is hoping that within 10 years the tenant will leave and they can either put the place up for sale with vacant possession or rent it out again at probably double the rent. Its an Investment Property, the existing tenant having been there for 60 years is an advantage as it helped when making a decision about buying the property and long term plans.
                              If she has been there for 60 years has an Electrical Safety Inspection ever been done, does the Gas cooker have a Gas Isolation Valve.
                              (In one property I bought recently some of the wiring was so old that the outside was lead, if it wasn't for regulations requiring an Electrical Safety Certificate I would not have known)

                              Comment

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