Missing electricals from inventory

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    Missing electricals from inventory

    Hello everyone,
    I hope you can perhaps advise. After 4 years my tenant has moved out. He has taken with him an expensive, quality brand hoover with a retail value of £300. Having moved out he now claims this 'broke' or within a month of his arrival 4 years ago, so he threw it out and bought a new one. It is listed on the inventory. I reminded him I had used this myself just before he moved in and again two years later (after some contractors had been) and it was working very well both times; I had also seen his own cleaner use it, and I saw it in the cupboard in the last month of his tenancy when I entered the house with letting agents.

    He then claimed my hoover wasn't working properly so he threw it out and said the one I had used and seen was a different hoover - but it's same make, model and colour! He then also claimed it was a present from a friend - presumably as he has no proof of purchase - but I find it hard to believe he was given the same make and colour etc and this is not a cheap hoover. He never mentioned to me it was broken at the time (or since), even though he was sent the inventory report where it is clearly listed. If it was broken (unlikely I think as it was working well and was only a year or so old ). I was given no chance to inspect it, get it repaired or serviced, even just empty the bag perhaps. I also had no chance to check either if it had broken because of misuse - sucking up water, or not changing the bag (I did provide bags as well) or something. He now wants to buy a second hand hoover from eBay for around £100 which I think is unreasonable, having walked off with mine which had only had one previous owner (the former very careful tenant). I do not want 2nd hand electrical goods whose provenance, age and use history is completely unknown to me. Am I obliged to accept second hand electricals? What can I reasonably and fairly charge him from his deposit for a replacement hoover, same make and model?
    Many thanks in advance

    #2
    Originally posted by Bosie View Post
    What can I reasonably and fairly charge him from his deposit for a replacement hoover, same make and model?
    (Cost of the original item and any installation/fitting [not the cost of a replacement] / expected lifetime) * (expected lifetime - actual lifetime).
    That is, compensation for the lost value (life of use) of the item.

    So if the hoover cost £300, let's say you'd expect it to last a decade and it would have been six years old when the tenancy ended, you've been deprived of four years of use.
    So £120 (40% of £300) would be reasonable compensation.

    You don't have to actually replace the hoover, and a used appliance would not be an acceptable replacement unless you agree that it is.

    You might usefully change your tenancy agreement so that what should happen if something stops working - would you expect to pay for a repair/replacement, for example.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #3
      Report theft to police after informing tenant you will be doing so - unless returned or good explanation given
      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

      Comment


        #4
        Thank you.
        jpkeates if the hoover 'broke' when claimed, four years ago that would make the hoover only 2 years old so would I do the calculation on that basis?
        theartfullodger I don't think the explanation is good, but I doubt the police would bother with this, would they? Or should I to report it, as a formality?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Bosie View Post
          if the hoover 'broke' when claimed, four years ago that would make the hoover only 2 years old so would I do the calculation on that basis?
          I wouldn't.
          In the first place, if the hoover broke, it broke and no compensation is due to you - the tenant could claim a loss if you didn't replace it (although that's academic as you don't believe them and, even in their account of events, they never told you it was broken, having, bizarrely decided to replace it at their cost).

          And you didn't experience any loss until the tenant moved out - prior to that the loss was, technically, theirs.


          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

          Comment


            #6
            This is a wind-up right ?
            ​​​​​​Presumably it's a high end property as the tenant has a cleaner AND a £300 vacuum, so rent over £1000 ?
            Not only has OP had £50,000 rent but also a great tenant who doesn't bother landlord just cos the hoover broke and sorts it himself.
            Time to move on I'm afraid and please don't call the Police, those of us not living off benefits have to pay for our Police service and they have better things to do than chase your 6 year old broken vacuum cleaner.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Section20z View Post
              This is a wind-up right ?
              ​​​​​​Presumably it's a high end property as the tenant has a cleaner AND a £300 vacuum, so rent over £1000 ?
              Not only has OP had £50,000 rent but also a great tenant who doesn't bother landlord just cos the hoover broke and sorts it himself.
              Time to move on I'm afraid and please don't call the Police, those of us not living off benefits have to pay for our Police service and they have better things to do than chase your 6 year old broken vacuum cleaner.
              So funny. I like the post about calling the police - imagine wasting the police's time over a £100 vacuum cleaner!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BuyToilet View Post

                So funny. I like the post about calling the police - imagine wasting the police's time over a £100 vacuum cleaner!
                Indeed, I was intrigued to learn there are human beings who consider the "provenance and use history" of a vacuum cleaner.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by BuyToilet View Post
                  So funny. I like the post about calling the police - imagine wasting the police's time over a £100 vacuum cleaner!
                  It's pointless because it's impossible to prove it was theft.
                  But if it was taken by the tenant, it was a crime.

                  £100 may not be much to you, but I'd object if someone took it out of my bank account.

                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm amazed you even provide a hoover!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks for comments. Section20z I appreciate the sentiment, but actually I get way less rent than that and its not a "high end" property at all, just a modest two bed flat. I also gave a rent holiday because of covid, at a cost to me of over a grand and half. That the tenant had a cleaner is really nothing to do with me, is it - lots of young working professionals do this - and its not something I personally feel I can pass judgement on, though you clearly feel differently! I don't think it's unreasonable not to want to accept 2nd hand electrical goods from who knows where, and however much you may dislike how I phrased that I see no reason for sarcasm. I also had no intention of reporting to police as I indicated but was just asking if there is a some specific reason I'm not aware of that prompted that advice to be given ...

                      The reason I provide a hoover Berlingogirl is because the superior lease demands the tenants clean the communal entrance lobby outside the flat, so I think its fair I provide one, as its wood floors in the flat so they wouldn't necessarily really need one otherwise. A good hoover makes the task easier and quicker and I want to encourage them to comply with the superior lease.

                      Is this forum always so judgemental?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        All forums are judgemental. The remote nature of the relationship emboldens us to make comments we might not make to peoples faces. However, this isn't always a bad thing and means you get the unvarnished responses that you wouldn't get elsewhere and which, though not always pleasant, may be the most helpful.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Section20z View Post

                          Indeed, I was intrigued to learn there are human beings who consider the "provenance and use history" of a vacuum cleaner.
                          Whilst I would consider a second hand vacuum cleaner for my own use, I would not consider one to provide to a tenant where I would be responsible for any harm they suffered from using it.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Bosie View Post

                            The reason I provide a hoover Berlingogirl is because the superior lease demands the tenants clean the communal entrance lobby outside the flat, so I think its fair I provide one, as its wood floors in the flat so they wouldn't necessarily really need one otherwise. A good hoover makes the task easier and quicker and I want to encourage them to comply with the superior lease.

                            Is this forum always so judgemental?
                            I didn't realise that. I've never heard of tenants all being responsible for cleaning the communal parts. I wouldn't be surprised if it gets left to just one or two tenants. I wonder if a contribution from each of the flats towards a cleaner might be a good idea. We do this for a small court of individual properties that have a shared area. Somebody is employed as a caretaker for the outside, although I do clear away the leaves and fallen branches, once a year myself just to keep it nice.

                            Comment

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