I'm convinced that my tenant is dead - but how do I prove it?

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  • sushi
    replied
    This needs an update!!

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  • Twohoots
    replied
    Do you have an update?

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  • Another Fine Mess
    replied
    Can you look on the Electoral Register to see if she had been taken off it.

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  • Twohoots
    replied
    Tired Old Chap - did you contact Adult Safeguarding? They really do work very fast!

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by flyingfreehold View Post
    Serve notice so as to put the rent up sharply in a couple of months time, if the tenancy is now periodic and these people are holding over under it; should elicit a reply
    This is a good idea - even a letter advising that the rent will go up would probably trigger some kind of response.

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  • flyingfreehold
    replied
    Serve notice so as to put the rent up sharply in a couple of months time, if the tenancy is now periodic and these people are holding over under it; should elicit a reply

    Leave a comment:


  • tired old chap
    replied
    Many thanks for taking the time to explain, it's appreciated, and probably gives a good insight into what's going on here.

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  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    Originally posted by tired old chap View Post

    That's interesting thank you. May I ask why they kept her in a hospital (with all the attendant risks to the elderly of picking up infections etc.) rather than a home?
    This happened nearly 2 years ago, before the pandemic. Mum was living by herself and was independent until she slipped over at the top of the stairs, didn't hurt herself but couldn't get up. I had to call the paramedics and they took her to the local hospital where she went down hill very rapidly. Within 2 weeks we could see that her dementia had worsened significantly. They then sent her to another hospital and she got worse and had to be sectioned under section 2, then section 3 and then sent to a more specialist hospital where they were brilliant with her. She did get the occasional UTI which really badly affects old people. Eventually we found a care home for her - this took about 8 months in all. She's been in the home for 14 months now and will spend the rest of her life there.

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  • tired old chap
    replied
    Originally posted by alttab11
    Can you ask the local council to check in on your tenant as a concern for their wellbeing. Many local council have this - there are also NHS volunteers?
    Check in on her where? She's not at home. I doubt that they'd want to play detective.

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  • tired old chap
    replied
    Originally posted by MdeB View Post

    I don't think Data Protection applies to dead people.
    I don't know for certain she is dead. Also if she is then I'd imagine they'd want to run it by next of kin before releasing info.

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  • MdeB
    replied
    Originally posted by tired old chap View Post
    I'm pretty sure that data protection law stops any of those from telling me anything (bar the neighbours, obviously).
    I don't think Data Protection applies to dead people.

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  • tired old chap
    replied
    Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
    If the old lady is in hospital with dementia she could be there for a long time ie months and months. This happened to my Mum. In the meantime we got Power of Attorney for finances and health.

    I would ask the family which hospital she is in , so you can visit her, and if they are applying for powers of attorney, and follow Twohoots suggestion, above.
    That's interesting thank you. May I ask why they kept her in a hospital (with all the attendant risks to the elderly of picking up infections etc.) rather than a home?

    Leave a comment:


  • tired old chap
    replied
    Originally posted by Twohoots View Post
    I think your quickest route is to get in touch with Adult Safeguarding at the council where she lives (or lived). Tell them you are concerned for her welfare and they will look into it urgently. They will be able to check with care homes, the registrar and other agencies very promptly.
    Great idea. Thanks!

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  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    If the old lady is in hospital with dementia she could be there for a long time ie months and months. This happened to my Mum. In the meantime we got Power of Attorney for finances and health.

    I would ask the family which hospital she is in , so you can visit her, and if they are applying for powers of attorney, and follow Twohoots suggestion, above.

    Leave a comment:


  • Twohoots
    replied
    I think your quickest route is to get in touch with Adult Safeguarding at the council where she lives (or lived). Tell them you are concerned for her welfare and they will look into it urgently. They will be able to check with care homes, the registrar and other agencies very promptly.

    Leave a comment:

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