Invoice dilemma

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    #16
    Originally posted by RMasterss View Post

    We air dry our washing in the living room with the windows open. Living room door is closed when we do this.

    I understand this could cause mould, but as it’s not done in the bedroom I don’t see how. But I get your logic.
    It really is worthwhile investing in a condensing tumble dryer, because drying your clothes indoors creates a huge amount of condensation.

    It's worth having a chat with your landlord and negotiating. Put it to him that you are aware the issue might be a lifestyle one. Suggest that if he doesn't pursue you for the invoice you can use the money to buy a condensing tumble dryer to see if it improves things.

    You could also or alternatively buy a humidifier and run it when you have washing out. It may help.

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      #17
      Drying washing indoors causes mould. It does not just cause mould in the room washing is dried.

      Heating helps because hot air carries more moisture and when it vents out the moisture is carried out. So you SHOULD NOT be switching the heating off when you open the windows. At least one window should be open a bit 24/7 365/365 (not 2 hours a day). Apart from moisture humans also have to breathe and to remove indoor pollution - the air in the whole house should be changed several times a day.

      Unless you can show some structural problem with the house that is letting water penetrate (guttering issues etc), mould is pretty much always the fault of the occupier I am afraid.

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        #18
        Water coming in from the outside doesn't normally cause mould, because water than comes in via a wall of cement floor is usually alkiline.
        This is almost certainly what the damp experts will have said before quoting the £200 call out fee.

        My son had a damp problem - caused by lifestyle and a cold patch on a bedroom wall (some kind of metal supporting beam) - and spent several hours being told by damp experts that they wouldn't come out because it was going to be condensation from moisture in the air in the house, or if they did it would cost a fortune for the visit.
        Eventually, they paid the smallest fortune and the guy walked in, pulled out some kind of meter and showed them how much moisture was in the air.

        It's not just washing (although that contributes), it's showers, boiling water for cooking or hot drinks, coming inside wet from outside.
        Every droplet of water that is inside the property has to go somewhere.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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          #19
          Originally posted by RMasterss View Post

          No such things are stated in my AST. Just the usual paying for utilities that we use.
          In that case there can be no legal basis for requiring reimbursement.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Jon66 View Post
            drying your clothes indoors creates a huge amount of condensation.
            I live alone, and my weekly coloured wash isn't even a half load. I put it on an extra spin cycle before putting it into my (condensing) tumble dryer.

            When I empty the water container, it's usually well over a litre. Incredible really. Like others have said, dry clothes on your radiators and that water has to settle somewhere.

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              #21
              Thank you all for your help.

              Decided I’m going to pay the invoice. I’ve got two dehumidifiers now, one in each room. Funnily enough; no condensation since I got them!

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                #22
                Originally posted by RMasterss View Post
                Decided I’m going to pay the invoice.
                Why pay something you have no obligation to pay?

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post

                  Why pay something you have no obligation to pay?
                  Not really in a position to move elsewhere and my tenancy is coming to the end. Hoping paying it will allow for us to get another year.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by RMasterss View Post
                    Not really in a position to move elsewhere and my tenancy is coming to the end. Hoping paying it will allow for us to get another year.
                    Sometimes taking the line of least resistance is the sensible option. Is it sensible here?

                    First and foremost there is no legal obligation to pay.

                    Apart from that, if reimbursement was expected you should have been told beforehand. A reasonable proposal would have been to say how much the inspection would cost and that you would pay if no problem was found and the landlord would pay if there was a problem. You would then at least have had a choice,

                    Do you know who exactly the person was who came round? Was he a surveyor or other professional? Was he an employee of the agent? Have you seen the invoice? If you are not satisfied as to the qualification of the person who inspected ask the agent. If it turns out he had no relevant professional qualification or is an employee then call in the council.

                    I should not worry too much about getting a new tenancy as at the moment landlord's have to give at least six months' notice.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      If you get mould, then you need to treat it. (as well as reporting it)
                      Wash off what you can, then a mould remover, or bleach. (I use paint brushes or tooth brushes to apply it; sprays are uncontained).

                      In my home on autumn and winter mornings the windows and surrounding stone mullions are dripping with water from the moisture my wife and I breath out overnight.
                      We wipe off what we can and open the windows to finish the drying ready for the next night.

                      Even then we get mould, so periodically need to do mould treatment.

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by MdeB View Post
                        In my home on autumn and winter mornings the windows and surrounding stone mullions are dripping with water from the moisture my wife and I breath out overnight.
                        We wipe off what we can and open the windows to finish the drying ready for the next night.

                        Even then we get mould, so periodically need to do mould treatment.
                        Sleeping with the windows wide open stops this. We invested in a 16 tog super kingsize duck and goose down duvet. Works a treat.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Jon66 View Post

                          Sleeping with the windows wide open stops this. We invested in a 16 tog super kingsize duck and goose down duvet. Works a treat.
                          But doesn't stop your nose and ears from freezing.

                          And now I am getting old the cold air affects my breathing.

                          Comment

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