Electrician entering tenant's property to do check

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    Electrician entering tenant's property to do check

    I am about to send my tenant a formal letter requesting permission for electrician to do EICR.
    Do they have to let them in as it a Legal check for their safety?

    #2
    Unless there is something in tenancy agreement (very unlikely) requiring access for a elctrical check, no. Ask nicely, offer to be there to let in & supervise.

    I'd write along lines of "sparky's coming 10:30 am 23rd August could you let him in or shall I please??"
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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      #3
      Agree with above...... if your first contact with the tenant regarding this is with a ''' formal letter '' then i am not so sure this is the way to go, i simply call my tenant up or go round and knock on the door and discuss why either the plumber/electrician (pick your choice of trade) needs to come in, i have yet to have an issue with a tenant saying no. It is often for their good so why would they refuse..... just ask nicely first.

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        #4
        Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
        Unless there is something in tenancy agreement (very unlikely) requiring access for a elctrical check, no. Ask nicely, offer to be there to let in & supervise.

        I'd write along lines of "sparky's coming 10:30 am 23rd August could you let him in or shall I please??"
        As a tenant, it's far better to say something like "I need to arrange an electrical check at some point in the next month, could you let me know a few dates that are convenient?"

        I wouldn't let anyone in my home without me being there, and it really gets my back up that there's an assumption that the tenant will be around at any and all hours during the day.

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          #5
          newtenant9011 perhaps you are requested to be around to let in tradespersons is because that's what you do when you have a property. It is to your benefit so why wouldn't you?

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            #6
            Originally posted by Jon66 View Post
            newtenant9011 perhaps you are requested to be around to let in tradespersons is because that's what you do when you have a property. It is to your benefit so why wouldn't you?
            Yes, but you also get a say in WHEN they appear. I have no issue with tradespeople coming in, but (unless it's an emergency), as a tenant I would expect to be consulted about a date / time.

            Plenty of reasons why I might not be available at a specific date / time that I've had no say in, including work, existing leisure plans, holidays etc etc. It's pretty unreasonable to just assume your tenant can drop everything to be available on a date that they've had no input into for the purposes of an electrician / gas engineer completing a planned report. It's not unreasonable to message the tenant a couple of months in advance and say "Hey, the gas / electrical inspection needs to be in <insert month>, are you happy for me to book the electrician/gas engineer whenever and give them a key/I let them in, or would you like to be around - if so could you give me a few days that would work for you and I'll arrange it then".

            If it's an emergency, then that's completely different and there is absolutely a right of entry. For an urgent repair, again, asking the tenant about dates before booking is good, but obviously it does need to be done asap.

            I have no sympathy for anyone booking something that's planned (such as an inspection) to then be told by their tenant sorry, can't do that day you'll need to rebook. It's common courtesy to ask, after all it might be your house, but it's their home.

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              #7
              Well since the tenant receives a copy of the gas safety certificate, the EICR, the EPC and God knows what else they would actually be in a position to plan when they next fall due

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                #8
                Originally posted by ChrisDennison View Post
                Well since the tenant receives a copy of the gas safety certificate, the EICR, the EPC and God knows what else they would actually be in a position to plan when they next fall due
                Doesn't change the fact that it's not unreasonable to let the tenant have a say in the day the electrician / gas engineer comes over.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by ChrisDennison View Post
                  Well since the tenant receives a copy of the gas safety certificate, the EICR, the EPC and God knows what else they would actually be in a position to plan when they next fall due
                  But that doesn't mean the T has to put themselves out for it.

                  I'm with newtenant9011 here.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by newtenant9011 View Post

                    As a tenant, it's far better to say something like "I need to arrange an electrical check at some point in the next month, could you let me know a few dates that are convenient?"

                    I wouldn't let anyone in my home without me being there, and it really gets my back up that there's an assumption that the tenant will be around at any and all hours during the day.
                    There's no such assumption. My post stated tenant does have to let anyone in. Of course a tenant may refuse. No issue.

                    Now, if a landlord can arrange with tenant's concurrence to let sparky in, all well and good.

                    Apologies that you felt as you did
                    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post

                      There's no such assumption. My post stated tenant does have to let anyone in. Of course a tenant may refuse. No issue.

                      Now, if a landlord can arrange with tenant's concurrence to let sparky in, all well and good.

                      Apologies that you felt as you did
                      It's fine, to be fair most of my landlords have been fine, but I have had one in the past who kept booking things (inspections, gas safety checks etc) without checking with me, and most of the time it was when I was post night shift or it was otherwise inconvenient. This was hassle for both of us, because I had to keep saying no, sorry, here are the dates I can do this month (of which there were many as I worked rotating shifts so often did have weekdays off), whereas if I'd been asked in advance, it would have made it easier for the both of us.

                      Contrast that with a different letting agency/LL I used who, when I mentioned I was working shifts, emailed their availability at the start of the month (HMO) and gave me a week to get back to them with convenient dates / times which worked far better for both of us.

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                        #12
                        I do always check the tenant is ok with any arrangement and have a good relationship with mine, but you are assuming we have a choice. Have you ever asked a tradesman to come on a Saturday or an evening? Have you ever tried to specify precise times? It's actually quite difficult, particularly if they're good so are in demand. I'm sorry, but if you call me to tell me the shower is not working and you'd like it repaired, then some effort may be required on your part. Whilst I'm happy to facilitate this when I can, I travel extensively and may not even be in the UK. What would you do if the property belonged to you and you lived in it?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Jon66 View Post
                          I do always check the tenant is ok with any arrangement and have a good relationship with mine, but you are assuming we have a choice. Have you ever asked a tradesman to come on a Saturday or an evening? Have you ever tried to specify precise times? It's actually quite difficult, particularly if they're good so are in demand. I'm sorry, but if you call me to tell me the shower is not working and you'd like it repaired, then some effort may be required on your part. Whilst I'm happy to facilitate this when I can, I travel extensively and may not even be in the UK. What would you do if the property belonged to you and you lived in it?
                          I mentioned this, it's not like I was saying it needs to be a specific time - it was more along the lines of can you let me know which days are best for you. Of course I understand that it's a nightmare to get a tradesperson out out of hours / weekends unless it's an emergency (and you'll pay handsomely for it), but where possible asking which days are best within a timeframe is enough to allow a tenant to make arrangements, but also stop clashes with things they can't miss. The more urgent the repair, the tighter the time frame for being available.

                          Again, if the property belonged to me and I lived in it I would have a say in the timescale in which the tradesperson came out. I've never said I'm not happy to be available, or even to put myself out (IE, arrange working from home, or even taking leave), because that's part of the reponsibility you take on by living somewhere that isn't a hotel, but given that's what's expected of a tenant (and I'm not saying that's a bad thing!) there needs to be some level of involvement with the tenant when arranging things, rather than just arranging something and telling the tenant that's when it is.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Jon66 View Post
                            I do always check the tenant is ok with any arrangement and have a good relationship with mine, but you are assuming we have a choice. Have you ever asked a tradesman to come on a Saturday or an evening? Have you ever tried to specify precise times? It's actually quite difficult, particularly if they're good so are in demand. I'm sorry, but if you call me to tell me the shower is not working and you'd like it repaired, then some effort may be required on your part. Whilst I'm happy to facilitate this when I can, I travel extensively and may not even be in the UK. What would you do if the property belonged to you and you lived in it?
                            Just part of the fun, expense, difficulty of the job.

                            All roles in my experience have such fun, expense, difficulty.

                            If they're too much, perhaps with legislation etc etc etc then a landlord should choose another role.
                            I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Celibin View Post
                              I am about to send my tenant a formal letter requesting permission for electrician to do EICR.
                              Do they have to let them in as it a Legal check for their safety?
                              If the property is let as a dwelling for a term of less than seven years then section 11(6) of the Housing Act 1985 woud seem to apply:

                              In a lease in which the lessor’s repairing covenant is implied there is also implied a covenant by the lessee that the lessor, or any person authorised by him in writing, may at reasonable times of the day and on giving 24 hours’ notice in writing to the occupier, enter the premises comprised in the lease for the purpose of viewing their condition and state of repair.

                              The statute does provide for a rather short period of notice. However, since it is set out in statute there is no prospect of it being considered unfair under any consumer legislation.

                              As others have been suggesting, the statutory provision is best left in reserve for a tenant who is not being co-operative. Landlords who treat their tenants as customers paying for a service, rather than as second class citizens whom they graciously condescend to allow to occupy their property, are more likely to get co-operation.

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