No DSS' letting bans 'ruled unlawful' by court

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #76
    Originally posted by boletus View Post
    Thanks for the explanation.
    I find it odd there is no mention of a settlement offer in your earlier link.
    The detail wasn't originally there.
    There's no mention of a settlement offer (only pre-action communication).
    I only assume that they must have tried to make some kind of attempt not to go to court - it's possible they didn't.
    Once they realised Shelter were involved, they must have expected to lose.

    If I wasn't going to bother defending, I'd have been bleating to the judge that I'd already offered them £3000 (the out of court settlement in the 'Amanda' case).
    They might have done, it's not a very high settlement, but the costs might be a bit steep.

    One last query, do you think that is the full declaration or just the edited highlights they want us to see?
    This is the declaration - http://431bj62hscf91kqmgj258yg6-wpen...ourt-Order.pdf

    The names are missing (which is odd because the claimant has made public statements and has been named) and there's nothing in the section heading Conclusion.
    But there doesn't seem to be anything to add as a conclusion, so it may be complete.

    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

    Comment


      #77
      Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
      I wonder if "No DSS" applies to a room in a HMO? My room rate is based on people being at work all day and no heating on, but a person who is unemployed will be in all day potentially with the heating on 24/7 and therefore the cost of renting to them is higher. If I charged two different rates would this be discriminatory?
      If you mean is it discriminatory to charge a different rate for "DSS" instead of refusing, then probably - unless you can justify that it is reasonable.

      Will you charge someone claiming housing benefit but working 35 hours a week on an apprenticeship the lower rate?
      Will you charge people who work from home or do night shifts the higher rate?
      All you have to do is look at the different circumstances before deciding.

      Comment


        #78
        The parents and guarantor question is interesting -- because that is rent potentially paid out of not-own-EARNED-income. As is housing benefit.

        Equality demands that I reject any tenant who can't afford to rent out of their own self-earned income.

        It obviously is not a trivial point. When the benefits tenant stops paying (despite having the income stream, but having spent it on other stuff) who am I going to sue? The benefits office?

        Having something to lose if sued is a pretty big checkmark in the tenancy vetting ticksheet. You look, you decide, you just don't advertise the criteria.

        Comment


          #79
          Originally posted by Flashback1966 View Post
          I have had too many bad experiences with tenants on benefits. ​​​​​​
          Interesting. All of our tenants are on some kind of benefit and we haven't had any problems from any of them. In fact, the two that are on full benefits are the best of all.

          But, as with anything, past performance is no guarantee of future performance...

          Comment


            #80
            Agent should have thought up a different meaning for DSS. How about 'Dirty Student Slums'...

            'No your honour, it's nothing to do with not taking benefits. We are advertising that none of our properties are Dirty Student Slums, and using the popular initials for that.'

            Comment


              #81
              I also think there is a huge difference to taking on a tenant in receipt of HB or UC for a property costing 65k with a rent of 350 and a property costing 300k with a rent of 1100. In the north repairs are hugely cheaper than in the south east and property much more affordable whether renting or buying. In the south east the LHA rarely covers full rent and the risk is much greater with more to lose.

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by Ted.E.Bear View Post
                If you mean is it discriminatory to charge a different rate for "DSS" instead of refusing, then probably - unless you can justify that it is reasonable.

                Will you charge someone claiming housing benefit but working 35 hours a week on an apprenticeship the lower rate?
                Will you charge people who work from home or do night shifts the higher rate?
                All you have to do is look at the different circumstances before deciding.
                No I won't charge extra for someone claiming HB but working 35 hours nor an apprentice on the lower rate because they'll be out of the house at work.
                Yes to people who work from home (to cover the extra utilities, although in around 25 years of letting rooms I've never once had an enquiry from a SE person/ working from home), and no to night shifts (I've not found that night shifters make much of a difference).

                Our local YMCA rent is around £106 pw and the people in there tend to be unemployed so I think the same would be appropriate for a home worker in my HMOs. My cheapest room, for comparison, is £75 pw and my most expensive room is £85 for a very large double.

                Comment

                Latest Activity

                Collapse

                Working...
                X