Inventory Completion signing

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    Inventory Completion signing

    Hi all

    Do people recommend having their inventory 'witnessed' in terms of Landlord and tenant both signing

    Thank you for your time

    Regards

    Mike

    #2
    I don't bother, but just make sure we all sign before they move-in

    Comment


      #3
      I print off two copies, then write in the meter readings (taken with the tenants present). I get the tenants to sign on the last page (plus at the bottom of all of the other pages) of both copies. The tenants get to choose which copy they keep for their own records, and I keep the other.

      It might seem a bit extreme, but I feel it prevents any dispute at the end of the tenancy regarding swapped/inserted pages or my copy being different on day one.

      I also have a check-out form just for meter readings that we all sign (two copies, one for them, one for me).

      I don't have the signatures witnessed.

      Comment


        #4
        Any inventory or record of condition or combination of the two is part of the contract. If incorporated in the text as a schedule with the signatures coming after the schedule(s) no additional signatures are needed. If attached it is a good idea to have at least the first page signed, but there is no harm in having the subsequent pages signed or initialled if that is what you do with the main part of the agreement. If it is not to be attached to the agreement it should bear a signed statement to the effect that it is the inventory (or whatever) referred to in an agrement dated...made between... relating to...and signed accordingly.

        The main protection for both parties should be that each holds a complete copy of the tenancy ageement signed by the other.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Beswick View Post
          I print off two copies, then write in the meter readings (taken with the tenants present). I get the tenants to sign on the last page (plus at the bottom of all of the other pages) of both copies. The tenants get to choose which copy they keep for their own records, and I keep the other.

          It might seem a bit extreme, but I feel it prevents any dispute at the end of the tenancy regarding swapped/inserted pages or my copy being different on day one.

          I also have a check-out form just for meter readings that we all sign (two copies, one for them, one for me).

          I don't have the signatures witnessed.
          That is roughly what I do, but:
          • Go through the inventory with the tenant (explaining that "what is there" is to protect me and "condition" is to protect them).
          • Make changes as agreed with tenant regarding condition of items (in red and initialled in black).
          • At checkout I take two photocopies of the check-in inventory and annotate in red for issues I am concerned about, and to record the end of tenancy meter readings.
            I then ask the tenant how much of their deposit they think they should get back. I am surprised that often their starting position is not "all of it".

          Comment


            #6
            Useful idea for the inventory is to include things like the Gas Safety Certificate in the list of "what is there".
            And "Smoke alarns checked and working".
            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
              Useful idea for the inventory is to include things like the Gas Safety Certificate in the list of "what is there".
              And "Smoke alarns checked and working".
              It is better to include separate statements in the body of the agreement.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                Useful idea for the inventory is to include things like the Gas Safety Certificate in the list of "what is there".
                And "Smoke alarms checked and working".
                I provide a pack of documents in the kitchen (GSC, instructions for appliances and alarms,etc) and list each document in the inventory. I expect the tenant copy of the latest GSC to be present on check-out.
                I use a separate sheet to record documents provided:
                1. How to Rent (Government publication) (<date>)
                2. Energy Performance Certificate (<date>)
                3. DPS Custodial Scheme Terms and Conditions (<date> <version>)
                4. Fair Processing Notice
                5. Gas Safety Certificate (<date>)
                6. EICR (<date>)
                And a separate sheet to record actions:
                1. Smoke alarms in working order (tenant to test monthly).
                2. Carbon Monoxide alarm in working order (tenant to test weekly)
                3. Electrical consumer unit safety test (tenant to test monthly).
                4. Location of gas and electricity meters.
                5. Location and operation of water stop cock.
                And all of them are "no signature, then no keys".

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post

                  It is better to include separate statements in the body of the agreement.
                  Isn't the agreement about how each party will behave going forward, not about what has been done to date?

                  And a problem with that is that tenants do not necessarily read every clause of the agreement, so could argue that it was "hidden" in the large document, unless explicit signatures are required for those part as well as for the entire agreement.

                  It is far easier to demonstrate compliance to a court with a clear statement of "this has been done" with tenant signature and date at the bottom; it shows that it has been explicitly brought to the attention of the tenant.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                    It is better to include separate statements in the body of the agreement.
                    The problem is that the agreement is usually signed before some of these things are possible.

                    It's a legal requirement that smoke alarms are working and are checked on the first day of the tenancy.
                    That would usually be after the tenancy agreement has been signed - because the tenant isn't moving in without the agreement signed, and the tenancy doesn't start until they do.
                    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by MdeB View Post

                      I provide a pack of documents in the kitchen (GSC, instructions for appliances and alarms,etc) and list each document in the inventory. I expect the tenant copy of the latest GSC to be present on check-out.[*]Electrical consumer unit safety test (tenant to test monthly).
                      .
                      I agree and do the same thing (I include fire safety in the home leaflets +) but I have not heard of the ECU test. Is it necessary and what do they do?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by slooky View Post
                        Is it necessary and what do they do?
                        Consumer units in my properties have a manufacturer's sticker saying "test monthly".
                        I believe it sends some current to earth so that the breaker should trip.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Not all 'Consumer Units' have trip switches, but fuse box, which cannot be checked unless a fuse 'blows. ' Only Consumer Units with trip switches are termed Residual Current Device (RCD) AFAIK

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