Tenant demanding new carpets - is it my responsibility?

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    #16

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      #17

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        #18
        How old was the carpet?
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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          #19
          Hi there

          The property was decorated and carpeted before she moved in, so 5 years old

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            #20
            Originally posted by JK0 View Post
            I think replacing carpets damaged by pet wee would be very foolish. I wouldn't even be replacing them if there were no pets.
            ugh, sorry but why not? This post is quite obviously very one sided. It’s perfectly possible the house is damp and the tenant didn’t feel safe keeping mouldy carpets down. I had a landlord like this once. Had a young baby and the property was damp ridden, solution was to send his mate around once a month to paint over the wet patches. Happy to take rent money but not have the property in a liveable condition. So how come you’d be happy putting a tenants health in danger to save yourself money?

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              #21
              Regardless of the state of the carpet, she should have called landlord and agents attention to the state of the carpet. Tenant has no right to ripoff carpet and demand another one. Next time she might throw out the bed or fridge or Coker then demand a replacement.

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                #22
                In fairness to the tenant the carpet looks quite worn. However why a tenant would think it ok to destroy someones property and then expect it to be replaced I have no idea. I would be inclined to refuse to replace the carpet, but you must go in and remove the gripper strips. If the tenant wants a new carpet they can go ahead.

                If there is a damp issue this should have been reported by the tenant to enable investigation. Condensation is almost always caused by the tenant not ventilating the property and not heating it appropriately.

                If rent payments have been missed you probably don't want to spend money unless on safety issues until they leave.

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                  #23
                  Just curious whether tenant did actually raise her concerns about damp (while being accused of causing it herself via condensation, no doubt with no evidence for LL to support that)? Had I raised damp many times and told to keep my windows open and blamed for it myself then I might be inclined to not want to life with mouldy carpets. Fact is we don’t know what the communication has been like. But you cannot expect a person to live in damp and mould if you can’t be bothered to sort it out. Health before money. Threads like this that make so many believe that some landlords are morally inept

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                    #24
                    Jon66,

                    While I agree to an extent, why do some landlords think it’s ok to leave tenants (and young children in some cases) in houses that have major damp issues for extended periods of time. Then get upset when said tenant feels they must take the issue into their own hands? Not all tenants are in a position just to leave a house with a immoral landlord as so many of us struggle and can’t simply find huge deposits to move at a drop. I have personally been on the other side of this. Rented a house that was ridden with damp, nothing to do with me or condensation. All i got told was to keep my windows open 24/7 (middle of winter) and an occasional visit from a mate to paint over the wet patches all over the walls. I wasn’t even in my twenties and had a young child. Not all damp issues are due to tenants, and quite frankly some ought to remember we are actually human beings who deserve to live in safe environments.

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                      #25
                      Damp in properties is something that is not generally well understood by either tenants or landlords. Tenants tend to believe that it can never be caused by their actions and landlords believe it can only be caused by their actions. I think that the correct response would have been to get a report from a damp specialist so that any structural defects or inherent cold spots can be dealt with, or on the other hand there is independent evidence that the tenant is failing to adequately ventilate.

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                        #26
                        Nice to see a reasonable response here. It’s a bit dull seeing the same like minded people championing OP on without any evidence that the issue has anything to do with the tenants behaviour.

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                          #27
                          Really appreciate all replies , thank you everyone.

                          In people's opinions - is the issue damp or condensation? There has been a damp course carried out in the Dining room where there was a damp issue, but I have been advised that the spots (as shown in some of the pics) are condensation related?

                          Of course, I agree that some of the carpets are threadbare and require replacement... I am just uneasy with her unpredictability re the rent!

                          Many thanks, again.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by ToodlePip10 View Post

                            Nice to see a reasonable response here. It’s a bit dull seeing the same like minded people championing OP on without any evidence that the issue has anything to do with the tenants behaviour.
                            I think most people’s advice here is quite reasonable. The main point remains: you cannot (as a tenant) remove the carpets in the property without discussing it with the landlord first. If the tenant really thinks there is mould due to structural defects then they need to at least keep the carpets until they have given the landlord a chance to do things properly. Then afterwards removing them may be a different discussion, but I don’t think this has happened here?

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                              #29
                              The stair carpet looks worn to me and ready to for replacing anyway. If the others looked like this I would replace them. Life of a cheap carpet is 5 years. There is usually a tide mark with penetrating damp but not with condensation. I would get someone to look at it before she finds a no win no fee lawyer to sue you. Have a look at it yourself first, leaking gutters, loose slate, damp chimney etc.

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                                #30
                                As I suggested earlier, I wouldnt want to keep a tenant that has pets in breach of the contract and who rips up my property without even asking.

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