Short term lets during Coronavirus crisis?

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  • AndrewDod
    replied
    By the way, for anyone following the actual science here, the rather useless Imperial College Epidemiology Unit who originally published the headline modelling reports saying that 500,000 people would likely die in the UK from this virus, have now admitted that it is a LOT less deadly than their fanciful assumptions (which they were told from the start were false) - and have revised the estimate down to 20,000 (far less than annual usual flu deaths). Largely on the basis of Imperial College reports, many Western economies have already been tanked, and many jobs, careers and businesses destroyed.

    At the moment most of the discussion of this fiasco is taking place on twitter

    https://twitter.com/AlexBerenson/sta...33211011690499

    https://www.newscientist.com/article...pert-predicts/

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  • nukecad
    replied
    I still fail to see any advantage in issuing a new TA over letting it go SPT?

    I just don't see what you are trying to gain here?

    Once that new TA ends then it will just go SPT anyway, unless there's another TA, and another, and ......
    You're just making uneeded paperwork for yourself.

    SPT is a short term tenancy agreement, just one that keeps rolling over without any paperwork until either side serves notice.

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  • DPT57
    replied
    No-one is supposed to be leaving their home unnecessarily and certainly not for a holiday, so I doubt this is an option.

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  • LondonLover
    replied
    I hadn't thought about AirBnB... Might this be a realistic option?

    Clutching at straws...

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  • LondonLover
    replied
    *In issuing a new tenancy, you'd have to resolve the previous (current) tenancy deposit - which is difficult because no rent is owed and you can't take money from the deposit of the tenant who's gone to cover missing rent on a different tenancy of which he is not a part.*

    Sorry if I wasn't clear. No rent is owed at the moment, but I am under no illusion that the tenant who left will pay her last month's rent, i.e. 7 April to 6 May.

    I was hoping that I could use her share of the deposit in lieu of her share of the last month's rent. Is this not possible?

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  • AndrewDod
    replied
    Originally posted by LondonLover View Post
    - issue some kind of separare short-term tenancy agreements for the 2 tenants, e.g. on a month by month basis, and try to find new tenants to fill the vacant room(s).
    Various governments have bent over backwards to make sure that there are no such things as flexible short term tenancies (you could use AirBnB I guess) - even though that is exactly what many people want and need - especially right now - to be near children, family, love and care.

    So no.

    The entire structure is designed to make it as hard as possible and as dangerous as possible for everyone who wants and needs what you want to offer.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    The main reason for leaving things as they are is that if you issue a new tenancy agreement it will be a brand new tenancy, because the tenant will be different.
    That means you can't serve a s21 notice for 4 months, so even if you exercised a break clause you have an issue.

    In issuing a new tenancy, you'd have to resolve the previous (current) tenancy deposit - which is difficult because no rent is owed and you can't take money from the deposit of the tenant who's gone to cover missing rent on a different tenancy of which he is not a part.

    It's already a bit of a mess and anything positive you are able to do to change things will (as far as I can see) make it worse.

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  • LondonLover
    replied
    I want to avoid a monthly periodic tenancy.
    One tenant has already scuppered, and I'm sure the other foreign tenant will just leave before her national airline stops flying.

    I know that the remaining tenant is by law liable for the full rent.
    But I'm not kidding myself that she would pay it.
    And I wouldn't want to pursue her through the courts.

    Realistically, I think I have 3 options:

    - hope that both leave at the end of the notice period (probably forcing me to leave the property empty until life returns to normal)

    - accept that this will become a periodic tenancy in May and hope that the remaining tenant will at least pay her share of the rent

    - issue some kind of separare short-term tenancy agreements for the 2 tenants, e.g. on a month by month basis, and try to find new tenants to fill the vacant room(s).

    I'd much prefer the last option, but I have no idea what kind of temporary/short-term agreement, or if indeed there is such a thing.

    I'm sure my situation must be very common at the present time, especially in London, where joint ASTs seem to be standard for sharers.

    Leave a comment:


  • nukecad
    replied
    I'd just leave things as they stand, and deal with things if/when they arise.

    If the tenancy has ended (albeit early because of the notice) then unless you have a possession order and enforce it then it should automatically roll over into a monthly periodic tenancy if they stay.
    (Not entirely sure there because of the break clause notice?)

    Nobody knows what the situation will be in a month, six months, or even a year from now.

    Will your tenant even be able to go back to her home country?
    Nobody is flying anywhere much at the moment.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesas...ing-and-where/

    Leave a comment:


  • LondonLover
    replied
    I appreciate they are jointly liable for the rent.
    No rent is owing at this time.
    I'm hoping to use the deposit of the tenant who has left in lieu of her share of the rent for the last month.

    As it stands, the current tenancy will end at the beginning of May. The tenants gave 2 months notice, and I issued both a Notice of Termination and a S21 at the same time.
    I don't see a need for a S8 notice at this point.

    My question is: if the two remaining tenants want to stay, what is the best tenancy agreement to use?
    Particularly in view of the fact that one tenant only wants to stay an extra month, ie until beginning of June, at which point she will return to her home country.

    Ideally I would like to issue each tenant with some kind of separate/individual short-term agreement which both parties could easily terminate.

    Once all this C19 stuff settles down, the one remaining tenant can leave or find 2 new people to share with - at which point I'd issue a new AST.

    I hope this is clear.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpkeates
    replied
    Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
    Have you served s8s on both at the address you have (property)? If not suggest you do
    What purpose will that serve?

    There's no county court system to enforce it, no-one evicts the tenants without 2 month's rent owing and it will stress the tenants who seem to be happy to pay some rent which the landlord is happy to accept.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    Have you served s8s on both at the address you have (property)? If not suggest you do

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    A new AST will give the tenants new rights.
    As this is already a complete mess from a proper legal point of view, I'd probably do nothing, accept the rent offered and wait for the tenants to move out when things are more normal.

    They are all liable for all the rent, so they'll be in considerable arrears, should you need to serve notice in future.

    Leave a comment:


  • Interlaken
    replied
    If the tenants were joint how come the one that skipped the country did not pay the rent. They are jointly liable to pay the rent.

    Leave a comment:


  • LondonLover
    replied
    As stated.... AST with joint and several liability

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