Electrical Safety Certificates

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    #76
    Okay, this is the version without the electrician's estimate:

    I asked my agent to get EICR's for two of my flats here in Reading. Rather than provide them they sent two estimates. The higher one was £995. They say that if I don't accept that, they will send a failed EICR in two weeks time.

    I'm so waiting for Bojo to get this sort of blackmail.

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      #77
      I just heard from the electrician I booked to do the EICR at my house in London tomorrow. He wants to postpone it as my tenants are all there working from home.

      In view of this, it's going to be difficult, to say the least, to get 14 properties inspected and upgraded by next April. I wonder if TPTB can be prevailed upon to forget about this legislation for the time being?

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        #78
        FTA: Did anyone manage to get an EICR before the lockdown?

        The reason I ask, is that if this requirement comes in as planned on 1st July, will you have been able to get an electrician out and done any 'necessary improvements' by then?

        We've only got 3 months guys!

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          #79
          Originally posted by JK0 View Post
          We've only got 3 months guys!
          Only for new tenancies, not existing. I also think its not going to be a local authority priority to do much about a breach at the moment either, even if the tenant brings it to their attention. I understand that they have to serve a remedial notice requiring the work done within 28 days, but I don't think this has to be an Improvement Notice, so s21 shouldn't be affected. The landlord can also make written representations to them about the notice within 21 days of receipt, and I would have thought that a landlord who says they've been delayed due to CV19 would be sympathetically heard.

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            #80
            Thanks DPT57.

            BTW, looks like I was right about EICR's being used as 'loss leaders'. The two EICR's from one agent cost £125 each and lead to the result in #76 above. The flats were built in 1998 and 2002.

            Another agent asked £352, and mysteriously only found the need for replacement of an out of date smoke alarm. The flat was built in 2001.

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              #81
              BTW, the taxman's going to be even more hard up in view of Coronavirus, isn't he? I've already lost two of my tenants accounting for £2k a month, plus of course I will have to start paying council tax for them. If it takes three months to find new tenants, that's about £6.5k lost. With electrical certificates to get before next April costing maybe £500 per property, I make that another £7k, or £13.5k in all.

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                #82
                I had an EICR done on my flat in West London prior to the lockdown (Nov 2019) at a cost of £415 ex. VAT (but included some remedial earth bonding work). The engineer's assessment was "Satisfactory", but there were 3 outstanding C3 improvement recommendations on the report:
                1. Replacing the old style plastic fuse box consumer unit. I plan to get this replaced once Covid-19 has been sorted, partly for the tenants safety, but mainly to stay in my electrician's good-books.
                2. No labelling of circuits on the consumer unit. I subsequently fixed this myself, but I am not a qualified electrician, so presumably it would need another EICR to check it?
                3. No schedule of circuit details. Yet to find out what this means. Is it that newly built houses now provide circuit diagrams to the new owners?
                But at least I've now 5 years breathing space and I don't believe I must submit the report to any local council "jobsworhs" as I am a partial shareholder of the freehold.

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                  #83
                  Originally posted by kennyj52 View Post
                  1. Replacing the old style plastic fuse box consumer unit. I plan to get this replaced once Covid-19 has been sorted, partly for the tenants safety, but mainly to stay in my electrician's good-books.
                  That's a bit pointless, isn't it?

                  Originally posted by kennyj52 View Post
                  2. No labelling of circuits on the consumer unit. I subsequently fixed this myself, but I am not a qualified electrician, so presumably it would need another EICR to check it?
                  Pointless again.

                  Originally posted by kennyj52 View Post
                  3. No schedule of circuit details. Yet to find out what this means. Is it that newly built houses now provide circuit diagrams to the new owners?
                  Wouldn't the EICR he's just produced, include a schedule of circuit details?

                  Originally posted by kennyj52 View Post
                  But at least I've now 5 years breathing space and I don't believe I must submit the report to any local council "jobsworhs" as I am a partial shareholder of the freehold.
                  I believe you need to submit it if they ask for it.

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                    #84
                    I would agree with you that it is pointless before the new regulation for mandatory EICRs came into force, but now I'm just trying to stay ahead of the game and get things done before I'm forced to by some "jobsworth" electrician or council and have to pay through the nose for it too.

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                      #85
                      Originally posted by kennyj52 View Post
                      before I'm forced to by some "jobsworth" electrician or council and have to pay through the nose for it too.
                      They are recommendations only so nobody is forcing you. Just leave it as it is and move on

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                        #86
                        Bad news! The NRLA having looked again at the wording of the regulations have concluded that they
                        "do not appear to allow for a qualified inspector to declare the installations are safe, even if they do not meet these new standards. This means that substantial alterations to the property may need to be made as the 18th Edition is a recent publication and most properties were not built or altered with this publication in mind". If they are right then it means that the MHCLG letter to ATC reproduced earlier in this thread may not be correct.

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                          #87
                          I wrote to my MP, and received a copy of a response from the MHCLG which very carefully doesn't answer my direct question about the issue.
                          However, it does say that items that are not dangerous can be marked C3.

                          I think the basic problem is that the MHCLG doesn't understand its own drafting and thinks the proposed legislation says something that it doesn't.
                          Or, more accurately, doesn't say something that it does.

                          And because its being legislated as a Statutory Instrument, no judge can read parliament's debate of the legislation to try and infer the intent, because there isn't any debate.
                          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                          Comment


                            #88
                            this is an excellent post on the topic

                            https://nearlylegal.co.uk/2020/01/el...ed-regulation/

                            Comment


                              #89
                              Originally posted by DPT57 View Post
                              Bad news! The NRLA having looked again at the wording of the regulations have concluded that they
                              "do not appear to allow for a qualified inspector to declare the installations are safe, even if they do not meet these new standards. This means that substantial alterations to the property may need to be made as the 18th Edition is a recent publication and most properties were not built or altered with this publication in mind". If they are right then it means that the MHCLG letter to ATC reproduced earlier in this thread may not be correct.
                              Be interesting if this gets to court, won't it?

                              Comment

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