Revised AST

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  • Revised AST

    Hi All,
    Can anyone advise me please on a quick query? I have tenants who are probably the best tenants you could hope for. The have been in the property for 9 months and at the end of the 1st 6 months I got them to sign a new AST for another 6 months. I have since realised that my standard AST is a bit thin on the ground in places and so I have drawn up a revised version which I intend to use for all my Let properties. As each of the current agreements reach the end of their term can I then introduce the new updated version to replace the expired AST or will the terms of the old AST still be considered to be in-place?
    Any advice would be appreciated. Many thanks in advance.

  • #2
    You can offer to grant a revised form of AST. What then happens depends on T.
    1. T agrees and signs it.
    2. T does not agree and refuses to sign it. Old AST then continues, as statutory continuation tenancy, unless you serve s.21 Notice to seek possession- which you could do at same time as inviting T to sign revised form of AST.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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    • #3
      Thanks Jeffrey. I'm glad that its as simple as I hoped it would be. When I invite them to stay on for a further 6 months I'll explain why I'm altering the agreement and give them plently time to read through and to obtain a solicitors approval of it if they so wish. I'm sure they will understand my point of view if I speak to them and I cant imagine having any problems with them anyway.
      Thanks again.

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      • #4
        Remember to put your tenant's deposits in the TDS if the original tenancies started before April 2007.
        The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

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        • #5
          Yes I did register the deposits when they first took tenancy.

          Thats another thing I could rant on about actually. Isn't it disgusting all these regulations the government has brought in regarding private residential lettings? We're only trying to save a bit towards our pensions and all the time the government make it so that in every situation the tenants get to walk all over us while we pick up the bill and get aggrovation and taxed to the hilt! Where is the fairness in that?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by househunter View Post
            Thats another thing I could rant on about actually. Isn't it disgusting all these regulations the government has brought in regarding private residential lettings? We're only trying to save a bit towards our pensions and all the time the government make it so that in every situation the tenants get to walk all over us while we pick up the bill and get aggrovation and taxed to the hilt! Where is the fairness in that?
            Granted (ranted) but BTL is not [yet] a compulsory activity. If you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen? Or try life as a tenant?
            JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
            1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
            2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
            3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
            4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by househunter View Post
              Where is the fairness in that?
              Government and Fairness, there are two words that just don't go together.

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              • #8
                I would get out, Jeffrey but the amount I would have to pay in penalties with the mortgage lenders and then estate agents fees and solicitors fees mean I would lose too much money. I'll have to wait until the properties are worth a bit more and then sell.

                Comment

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