Resrouces for landlords?

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    Resrouces for landlords?

    Hello. I have a couple of properties which I had managed. I want to now manage them myself since I felt I was doing most of the leg work and maintenance myself anyway. Can anyone recommend a resource online which is a good all round portal for tenancy templates and other things please? I suppose a set of reasonable templates would be the most important thing as I can handle the deposits and inventories fairly easily myself.

    Many thanks

    #2
    If you want templates, join one of the various bodies and become a member, that way you get the most up to date documents based on the current legal and regulatory wordings you would need, otherwise any templates you find on the web may be out of date.

    Comment


      #3
      Appreciate many landlords and agents dislike them but both these sites provide a wealth of free info...


      https://www.shelter.org.uk/
      &
      https://england.shelter.org.uk/legal

      &
      https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com....php?t=5180214
      - a great start..

      This is worth a look - I highlight the s21 part..
      https://nearlylegal.co.uk/2019/09/up...-21-flowchart/

      Join RLA or NLA , use their documents, helpline & do some courses...

      & maybe a spell-checker to go with the other resrouces for landlords? ;-) ;-) ;-)
      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

      Comment


        #4
        But beware: no agreement is likely to contain everything you want, and will definitely not contain any covenants from the deeds of your properties.

        Also they may not be totally corect (e.g. RLA agreement contains a clause that starts "If we allow you to remain in the Property after the fixed term...", which is a meaningless concept, and the rest of the clause refers to something in the Housing Act 1988 that does not exist).

        I would seek agreements from several sources and see what each offers and decide which parts you want to take from each.

        I would also recommend reading about tenancy agreements on LandlordLawBlog, where it explains why some clauses are needed even though they appear at first glance to be inappropriate (e.g. they cover the case of the tenancy ceasing to be an assured tenancy)

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by MdeB View Post
          But beware: no agreement is likely to contain everything you want, and will definitely not contain any covenants from the deeds of your properties.

          Also they may not be totally corect (e.g. RLA agreement contains a clause that starts "If we allow you to remain in the Property after the fixed term...", which is a meaningless concept, and the rest of the clause refers to something in the Housing Act 1988 that does not exist).

          I would seek agreements from several sources and see what each offers and decide which parts you want to take from each.

          I would also recommend reading about tenancy agreements on LandlordLawBlog, where it explains why some clauses are needed even though they appear at first glance to be inappropriate (e.g. they cover the case of the tenancy ceasing to be an assured tenancy)
          I think that was the NLA actually, but neither has a perfect model agreement.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by DPT57 View Post

            I think that was the NLA actually, but neither has a perfect model agreement.
            Yes, NLA. Old age catching up with me.

            Comment


              #7
              The thing about getting advice on the internet is that you can rarely be sure who is giving it and when it comes to documents what their pedigree is. Of course advice and documents may be unsound if they come from a supposedly reliable source.

              Regulars will know that there is a lot of rubbish drafting about. All of the tenancy agreements I have seen (other than the government one) are very much cobbled together and lack proper coherence. They are just about adequate, though a few contain some howlers.

              Even if you find some decent precedents you cannot be certain that they are quite what you want or need. MdeB suggests taking what you want from various sources, but you need to be wary about drawing up your own documents if you have no experience. You should even draw back from changing any document, A national firm of surveyors I acted for had a strict rule that no member of staff was allowed to alter any of the tenancy documentation by even a word without referring to me. If that applies to professionals it is even more appropriate to someone starting out to manage.


              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                All of the tenancy agreements I have seen (other than the government one) are very much cobbled together and lack proper coherence.
                Thanks. So generally speaking if I just use the Government one and add / adjust it slightly then this would be a good start?

                Comment


                  #9
                  You need AND a lot of other documents.
                  I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Northcave View Post

                    Thanks. So generally speaking if I just use the Government one and add / adjust it slightly then this would be a good start?
                    I don't know of any experienced landlord who uses the turgid government 'model' agreement.

                    50 pages of inaccuracies and potential pitfalls.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Northcave View Post

                      Thanks. So generally speaking if I just use the Government one and add / adjust it slightly then this would be a good start?
                      One error in the model agreement is para 3.5. Total deposit may not exceed 5 weeks' rent.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Northcave View Post
                        Thanks. So generally speaking if I just use the Government one and add / adjust it slightly then this would be a good start?
                        The government agreement has the distinct disadvantage that the guidance notes are interspersed with the text. It has also not been updated for nearly four years.

                        Even slight adjustments can be dangerous. If you are not going to get an agreement tailor-made by a specalist lawyer, the best bet is to buy a guide to letting which has precedents in it and resist the temptation to tinker with them. To repeat what I said above, if a reputable firm of surveyors does not allow staff experienced in letting to change anything, you have to think that making changes is something an inexperienced person should not consider.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by boletus View Post
                          I don't know of any experienced landlord who uses the turgid government 'model' agreement.

                          50 pages of inaccuracies and potential pitfalls.
                          I have only ever had pointed out or found one issue with the government agreement

                          The length and sheer volume of it is off putting, but it is probably the best one I have seen - and the scale of it probably highlights an underlying issue with the other agreements that everyone actually uses.

                          You're in court with some sort of dispute with a tenant and someone asks, why didn't you use the freely available government document that probably represents best practice?
                          I'm not sure I have a good answer.
                          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                            I have only ever had pointed out or found one issue with the government agreement

                            There are many issues with it, which is a whole new thread if anyone can be bothered to disect it line by tedious line. (I can't)


                            Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                            why didn't you use the freely available government document that probably represents best practice?
                            Because it doesn't represent best practice (perhaps 'best in theory'?).

                            90% of landlords don't use it and 99% of professional landlords don't use it.

                            Do you use it yourself?
                            -honest answers only please!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                              The length and sheer volume of it is off putting, but it is probably the best one I have seen - and the scale of it probably highlights an underlying issue with the other agreements that everyone actually uses.
                              What the government agreement highlights is that there is a lot to consider when letting.

                              A question which can reasonably be asked is: Does it matter if my agreement is not that great? Assuming the absence of howlers and garbled drafting, the answer is: Probably not that much so long as both parties act reasonably. (It is also of course very much the case that a good agreement does not guarantee a problem free tenancy.) The snag is that if you do not have the expertise to draft legal documents you probably also lack the expertise to approve them, that is spot their deficiencies.

                              Comment

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