Mould and eczema

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    Mould and eczema

    Hi everyone,

    I was contracted to move into my new flat with three additional housemates three weeks ago, but there was a mould problem left by the previous tenants and the lettings agent agreed to prioritise removing it.

    The other housemates moved in anyway and haven’t had any major problems, but since I suffer from eczema I have been staying in a hostel as a precaution. Mould is well documented as a common trigger for symptoms of eczema, and although I’ve never been exposed to enough mould to know whether it would affect me personally, I’d really rather not risk it.

    The agency has yet to provide an estimated resolution date 3 weeks down the line, and the four of us are liable to pay full rent for this period. I did a little research and think I might be eligible to claim compensation under the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018. But since I have virtually no knowledge on law, I was hoping for a second opinion.

    Thank you in advance for reading and for any additional input!

    #2
    As the others are already living there with no problems then it's your personal choice not to move in, because of your personal concern (the uncharitable might say phobia).

    You can't blame others, and claim compensation from them, for something that is your own choice.

    Many properties have mould - that doesn't make them uninhabitable just in need of a clean in most cases.
    Some rubber gloves and some mould remover or bleach and the 4 of you should finish it in an hour or two.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by nukecad View Post
      As the others are already living there with no problems then it's your personal choice not to move in, because of your personal concern (the uncharitable might say phobia).
      But moving in does not mean it is fit for human habitation under the Act, and we cannot tell from our vantage point.

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        #4
        Fair comnent.

        Comment


          #5
          I think we need a but of a feel for what OP actually means here. There is mould and there is mould (every house has a few mould spores).

          If we are talking about a house with massive areas of mould many feet wide, black on many walls, it is definitely unfit for habitation. If its a very slightly mouldy smell and a few black spots on silicon around the shower - then probably not. Somewhere in between -- well that would depend on individual perceptions of risk and individual sensitivity.

          But in both cases it should have been evident to the OP on initial viewing if he/she was concerned about the particular point. Don't think it would be reasonable to sign a contract and then have part of the tenant not move in based on an evident issue and then claim compensation based on inability to occupy - and in any event there is no non-occupancy by the tenant.

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            #6
            You signed up for a joint T and are liable for the rent.

            Walls 'breathe' anyway, furniture may only lessen air ciculation to remove normal living condensation.
            Only EHO can really declare a property to be 'unfit for human habitation'.

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