Damp issues with rental property

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    Damp issues with rental property

    Good afternoon. I have a house that needs a new damp proof course, according to the council. It's currently tenanted and I am not sure if the council can legally get me to do it. Does anyone know of any new methods, ie lime based plaster as the house does have a physical damp proof course which was put in about 20 years ago and the bricks were injected with chemicals. The council used a meter reader (prong) that said there was damp in the walls but I have heard these are notoriously unreliable. There is no damp tide marks on the wall and all the skirting board is sound and no tenant has ever complained of damp. However there is mould in certain rooms which I believe is due entirely to condensation and insufficient ventilation. I have been told that injecting bricks with a chemical is not done any more so what are the new methods and how invasive are they. Do I have to remove plaster and skirting boards etc to do the work, and what happens to my tenants. do I have to give them all notice whilst the work is being carried out? Thanks in advance to all that reply.

    #2
    Hi
    I would get a damp specialist out, them £10 prong things aren't the best. If does need damp proof course the plaster skirts etc all have to come off. Wheres the mould? Try trickle vents on double glazed windows, it it electric heating?

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      #3
      Yes, the council can "get you to do it".

      Presumably, someone's complained, otherwise the council wouldn't be involved.

      I'd get a couple of experts in damp to come and have a look, test and confirm if they agree with you or the council and quote to remedy the issue.
      At least you'll know what you're dealing with.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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        #4
        Ive done this once with tenants in and was bathroom (Downstairs) diner and hallway and its the worst thing ive ever done, they twisted from the second then turned up, be careful

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          #5
          Why did the council get involved?

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            #6
            Originally posted by Richarddavid View Post
            I have a house that needs a new damp proof course, according to the council.
            Council should not be telling you what needs doing; they should be telling you what problems need fixing.

            Comment


              #7
              The problem is that untreated mould is a health risk and that is what will drive the Council to take action on behalf of the tenants. I had this problem on several occasions and it is difficult to find out the root of the problems with tenants in situ.I found that a negotiated departure may be best for all concerned until you find out what is the real cause of the problem as you will need time to find the causes - and time for the remedies to take effect.. If you have had the DPC done it is unlikely to be caused simply by the DPC failing, and any DPC engineer will usually tell you that as you have a DPC alreadyin place the damp is caused by the tenants lifestyle ( the logic is that because the DPC has been done it can't be anything else!!!) .This is not helpful as the damp may be ( = 'is usually') caused by something else.

              Have you looked at gutters and roof? You may have blocked rainwater channels or broken pipes etc. Look outside of the property when it is raining hard - is any water pouring onto outside walls? Do you have a chimney breast in the house and if so consider faulty flashings? If you have a moisture meter take readings of all walls in all rooms and look at the data - a higher score on one wall may indicate a leak from a gutter on a wall outside.If the reading on the chimney is high consider the chimney flashings on the roof may need attention.

              Take care when using engineers to advise you as most will be selling their own services which may or may not be the actual solution to your problem.



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