Tenant's troublesome dog

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    Tenant's troublesome dog

    Hi, I'm relatively new to being a landlord, I bought an ex council property in the same street as I lve, renovated it, and now rent it out to a couple who have been no problem at all, we get on well. They want to sign up for five years, and in the light of this, when they asked if they could have a dog, I agreed. The dog they got was a border collie pup who is now 6 months old and does not get enough exercise. It has been going to work with my tenant up until recently, and now they are trying to get it used to being in a pen in the garden. This is where the problem lies, it is barking constantly, and the neighbours on one side have complained. Apparently the dog got into their garden at one point and bit one of them when they were trying to remove it. My problem is, I am the proprietor of the village pub, therefore I know everyone that lives here. I have tried to explain to the neighbours that it won't do their neighbourly relationships much good if I intervene, and can they try and come to a solution without me, but I have had correspondence again today asking me to do something. My question is, is it my problem if my tenants have a noisy dog?

    #2
    No problem mate. Just don't expect neighbours to help you in any way, if you do nothing.

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      #3
      You can withdraw you permission to keep a pet/dog at any time (suggest 1 cal month).
      Neighbours can report injury to Police or cruelty to RSPCA at any time.

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        #4
        1 - Don't let anyone sign up for 5 years.

        2 - If the dog bit the neighbour, they should report it to the police as that's an offence.

        3 - Being both types of landlord in village sounds like a recipe for disaster.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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          #5
          What does your tenancy agreement and any other agreements say about pets in general and this dog in particular?

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            #6
            Neighbours need to contact council about the noise nuisance and the police about being bitten.

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              #7
              My teanancy agreement is currently under review as am terminating my 'fully managed' contract with an absolutely useless agent, and doing it myself. I have addded a clause which states that one dog is permitted and all efforts must be made to cause no nuisance to neighbours. I gather from the responses on here that it isn't my problem, its my house, but their home. However, as an aside, can someone enlighten me as to why I shouldn't let them sign up for five years when the agreement has a termination clause on both sides?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Costy View Post
                My teanancy agreement is currently under review as am terminating my 'fully managed' contract with an absolutely useless agent, and doing it myself. I have addded a clause which states that one dog is permitted and all efforts must be made to cause no nuisance to neighbours. I gather from the responses on here that it isn't my problem, its my house, but their home. However, as an aside, can someone enlighten me as to why I shouldn't let them sign up for five years when the agreement has a termination clause on both sides?
                You are so pushing me to sarcasm.

                Because a termination clause is not worth the paper it's written on?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Costy View Post
                  as an aside, can someone enlighten me as to why I shouldn't let them sign up for five years when the agreement has a termination clause on both sides?
                  A - because, for a landlord, signing a 5 year tenancy is a stupid idea and B - because any tenancy longer than 3 years has to be a deed (and should probably be drafted by a solicitor expert in property law, particularly if by termination clauses you mean break clauses).

                  And, if it has break clauses, the theoretical duration of the contract is actually no comfort to either of you.
                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you for the explanation, I know now its a stupid idea, but am still not quite sure why, but heyho. Not sure why the previous poster felt moved to sarcasm, I'm just a novice landlady asking for information on a friendly forum, I may be funny, but if I don't ask I won't know! So just to clarify, what do I do about the dog, offer advice, or as a last resort, threaten to force them to get rid of it?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Costy View Post
                      My teanancy agreement is currently under review as am terminating my 'fully managed' contract with an absolutely useless agent, and doing it myself.
                      It doesn't matter what you are doing with your agreement, it is what the agreement you have in place with your tenants that we are interested in, and which has any bearing on the situation.

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                        #12
                        Novice LLs should join NLA/RLA for at least 1 year & undertake their Modular Training for LLs.

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                          #13
                          About the dog: go round to the tenant and explain that there have been complaints about the dog barking and the neighbours have asked you to have a quiet word. The tenants might not even know that the dog is barking.

                          Go round to the neighbour and tell them you've had a word and that is all you can do about the situation. Any further complaints the neighbour should take to the tenant direct as you have no powers to intervene.

                          If this continues advise the tenant of the complaint and that you have suggested the neighbour complain to the environment agency at the council to get the sound monitor. This will fairly assess the situation and the neighbour can take the matter further if they want.

                          Tenants' pets are a curse, especially baby ones

                          Do not, under any circumstances, give an agreement of longer than 6 months, not least because when your tenant's dog has puppies your situation will get many times worse

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Costy View Post
                            However, as an aside, can someone enlighten me as to why I shouldn't let them sign up for five years when the agreement has a termination clause on both sides?
                            Because the anti-social behaviour of your tenants, (regarding their dog and possibly other stuff later) will rebound on you and you won't be able to get the tenants out. Give all tenants an initial 6 month tenancy and then let it go periodic.

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