requiring guarantor with a 18 year's tenant with no arrears ever

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    requiring guarantor with a 18 year's tenant with no arrears ever

    Curious for opinions from you landlords and landladies.

    Would you ask a tenant for a guarantor when he has been your tenant for over 18 years, never had a missed or even late payment ever.

    Yes I still am required to have one, and have been with my landlord now for past 18 years.

    I have questioned it a few times, and was rapidly told I can hand the keys in so they are perfectly happy to risk new tenants, empty property etc. to enforce this on a reliable tenant.

    #2
    Blame the government. Yes it is entirely sensible (under many circumstances) given prevailing laws, and the potential future political landscape.

    You sound like a great tenant - and if the landlord was properly protected if you ceased to be (instead of risking getting completely stuffed) then normal sensible interactions could apply.

    Comment


      #3
      Probably not, but as you asked for opinions;

      Is your job secure? Do you have large cash reserves/assets? Will your pension easily cover your rent on retirement?
      Are you on benefits, have you ever been on benefits, are you of a demographic likely to be on benefits?
      Has your landlord ever been placed in a position they felt it necessary to ask you to hand the keys in?
      Do you think it is ok to break the terms of a tenancy agreement and landlords should turn a blind eye to tenants running a business from home?
      Why is your landlord happy to risk new tenants and a void if you're a perfect (not just reliable) tenant?

      All rather unfair of course, but when the law is increasingly heavily loaded in the tenants favour, it is understandable that landlords react accordingly.

      Comment


        #4
        No I wouldn't.

        But it's possibly a requirement of their rent protection insurance.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by boletus View Post
          Probably not, but as you asked for opinions;

          Is your job secure? Do you have large cash reserves/assets? Will your pension easily cover your rent on retirement?
          Are you on benefits, have you ever been on benefits, are you of a demographic likely to be on benefits?
          Has your landlord ever been placed in a position they felt it necessary to ask you to hand the keys in?
          Do you think it is ok to break the terms of a tenancy agreement and landlords should turn a blind eye to tenants running a business from home?
          Why is your landlord happy to risk new tenants and a void if you're a perfect (not just reliable) tenant?

          All rather unfair of course, but when the law is increasingly heavily loaded in the tenants favour, it is understandable that landlords react accordingly.
          Does benefits mean I dont pay the rent? I have been on benefits since 15 years ago, I am disabled, not missed any rent payments. LL hasnt been informed I am on benefits so he may or may not know, it is however I know standard policy to do this for all his tenants. I am not been singled out.

          No landlord has never had to make any kind of threat to me, I dont even have rent inspections.

          Next question is a funny one, as I take it you have taken offence to another post I made. I think fundamentally the priorities for renting a property out is you get paid the rent on time and the property is kept in good condition, ideally tenant should be law abiding, not anti social etc. as well. When all that is good I would consider things like using the address for business post to be akin to a misdemeanor. Be careful what you ask for and dont have unrealistic expectations and perhaps over restrictive tenancy restrictions. This can also bounce back on you, as I also tend to turn a blind eye to minor issues with my landlord. I dont report every single little problem as an example. The other two flats in my building probably have at least 2-3 months every 2 years of no tenants. An example of turning a blind eye is when he sends people round to fix my boiler who are not registered gas engineers.

          "Why is your landlord happy to risk new tenants and a void if you're a perfect (not just reliable) tenant?"

          Exactly the question I want an answer to. As it makes no sense to me. Am I perfect? perhaps no but I am not far from it. How many tenants stay in one place for over 15 years, dont miss a single rent payment, and tolerate moderate or lesser problems, all whilst been very quite, no noise etc to disturb other tenants, law abiding and so forth, I also dont smoke and have no pets, children.

          However I will say this, I usually just have to tell them on the phone the guarantor form is on the way, and then they dont enforce it when it doesnt arrive, as my garantor has told me hasnt sent it for the past 5 years. So they are perhaps not willing to fully enforce it on me given my record. But I am not able to refuse it, they probably would evict if I did.

          Comment


            #6
            I don't consider using unqualified gas fitters a minor breach. Combined with the guarantor thing, I sense a landlord who thinks that they can do whatever they like, and are likely to be breaking the law in more ways than the gas safety issue.

            On the other hand, waiving a guarantor in your circumstances is something that requires a lot of human discretion. The landlord may have this condition imposed by lenders or landlord insurance, and the behemoth's behind these will probably not have resources allocated to consider individual cases, and just use rules like benefits = guarantor required.

            Comment


              #7
              If it is that the good news is those kind of discrimination policies are possibly going to be illegal soon in mortgage and insurance agreements. Assuming the government minister keeps to his word. It was brought up in a select committee.

              Comment


                #8
                We've had 5 ministers responsible for housing in the last 4 years.
                Keeping their word probably isn't going to matter much.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by tenant40 View Post

                  However I will say this, I usually just have to tell them on the phone the guarantor form is on the way, and then they dont enforce it when it doesnt arrive, as my garantor has told me hasnt sent it for the past 5 years. So they are perhaps not willing to fully enforce it on me given my record. But I am not able to refuse it, they probably would evict if I did.
                  This statement sounds like you have been asked for guarantor for many previous renewals, but your original post sounds like you have been OK for years and suddenly you are being asked for a guarantor.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    If you do not provide an acceptable G, LL could evict you.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by mariner View Post
                      If you do not provide an acceptable G, LL could evict you.
                      What I was about to say.

                      Comment

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