How do you handle the Tenant Fees ban?

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    #46
    Originally posted by DPT57 View Post
    I gave you one in post #40
    You did, and, being honest, I missed it because I linked to the thread from the notification (which took me directly to post 41.)

    That's a very interesting take, and I'll think more about that.
    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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      #47
      Originally posted by JK0 View Post
      I gave you one in post #25
      You did and I also accept that's a possible factor.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by boletus View Post
        It was a snapshot chosen at a cleverly selected time to fit an agenda.
        That's obviously possible.
        What would your conclusion be if the comparison was repeated over a different time period and the result was pretty much the same?
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment


          #49
          As per post #27.
          Repossession rates across all types of private landlord action have been falling since April 2014, rents have been increasing.

          Comment


            #50
            Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
            You did, and, being honest, I missed it because I linked to the thread from the notification (which took me directly to post 41.)

            That's a very interesting take, and I'll think more about that.
            I think this post from the guy with the pet issue is a good illustration: https://forums.landlordzone.co.uk/fo...le-a-pet-issue

            He listed a catalogue of damage, lack of care and breach of tenancy agreement that I wouldn't put up with as a London landlord, but he seemed very reluctant to consider eviction, possibly because of cost or low demand.

            There clearly must have been some landlords who care so little about their tenants that they evict just to get another £50 a month, but my sense from everything I've read is that s21 is mainly used for fault based evictions.

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              #51
              Although limitations on s21 are off topic for the original subject, I think the government's concern about them may be more to do with revenge evictions that are too subtle to handle using current revenge eviction law.

              Comment


                #52
                Originally posted by boletus View Post
                As per post #27.
                Repossession rates across all types of private landlord action have been falling since April 2014, rents have been increasing.
                The rate of the increases has dropped off considerably, bringing the South East more into line with the rest of the country.

                I think I should try and be clear, there's definitely a large number of s21 evictions which are to do with lack of rent and poor tenants etc. But there is, equally, a huge discrepancy that has to be accounted for somehow.
                The rate of repossessions has fallen overall (and slightly), but it's still significantly higher in some places than others.
                Originally posted by DPT57 View Post
                He listed a catalogue of damage, lack of care and breach of tenancy agreement that I wouldn't put up with as a London landlord, but he seemed very reluctant to consider eviction, possibly because of cost or low demand.

                There clearly must have been some landlords who care so little about their tenants that they evict just to get another £50 a month, but my sense from everything I've read is that s21 is mainly used for fault based evictions.
                I've got to say I tend to agree with the first point made.
                There are so few rental properties around generally (hereabouts anyway) that void periods are short (and they're part of the plan, generally).
                I suppose it doesn't really make much difference if 10 people want a property versus 200, the chances of finding a decent tenant are reasonable.

                Part of my issue with the idea of using s21 to implement a market rent when the sitting tenant can't pay it and someone else can is that I can see the logic.
                Landlording is a business and, within reason, maximising profits is a sensible thing to do.
                I'm not sure I'd say it that bluntly if that's what I'd chosen to do and someone asked me, but, putting my investment head on, why should a landlord subsidise a tenant?

                At the end of the day, the fundamental problem is the lack of properties available to people who want to live in them.
                Everything else is a bit cosmetic.
                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                Comment


                  #53
                  Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
                  Although limitations on s21 are off topic for the original subject, I think the government's concern about them may be more to do with revenge evictions that are too subtle to handle using current revenge eviction law.
                  If that was actually a real problem, the solution is more environmental health and tenancy relations "people".
                  The underlying problem isn't revenge evictions (which are a symptom), it's landlords not maintaining properties as they should.

                  I can't see how more legislation, however clever, is going to change the behaviour of people already ignoring legislation.
                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Unfortunately, recent governments tend to look for solutions that reduce, rather than increase, taxes.

                    (My view is that they have gone far to far and respect for the law is in serious decay because there is no credible threat of enforcement.

                    In particular, for revenge evictions, you need to spend money on proactive enforcement, so that the the landlord cannot blame the tenant when the law catches up with them, but all sorts of local authority enforcement are now "intelligence based", which means they will only act if someone tells them about a problem.

                    Landlord licensing is actually an attempt at proactive enforcement and finding a revenue stream for it which is outside central government austerity.)

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                      #55
                      Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
                      ]My view is that they have gone far to far and respect for the law is in serious decay because there is no credible threat of enforcement
                      Couldn't agree more.
                      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                      Comment


                        #56
                        Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                        I'd be more than interested in hearing different theories and conclusions.
                        In areas of high demand, tenants are more likely to exercise their right to stay until evicted.

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by MdeB View Post

                          In areas of high demand, tenants are more likely to exercise their right to stay until evicted.
                          Also, if the other rents in the area are sky high, maybe they think they'll get a nice cheap council house?

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                            The rate of repossessions has fallen overall (and slightly)
                            Section 21 levels (including London) are now back to 2003 levels. There was a massive spike at the time of the report due to benefit changes, increased taxes and increased legislation all hitting at once and hitting London the hardest. Landlords reacted accordingly.
                            This graph on here illustrates it perfectly (click on possession action/type by region, then on the top right drop box click only accelerated landlord);

                            https://public.tableau.com/profile/m...otesandContext

                            Comment


                              #59
                              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                              The rate of the increases has dropped off considerably, bringing the South East more into line with the rest of the country.
                              It hasn't JPK, London dropped off more than elsewhere (Brexit) but increases have been consistently steady since 2014.
                              Look at this;

                              https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/infla...eviousReleases

                              Comment


                                #60
                                What a fabulous and thoughtful thread.

                                kelbol

                                >How can a LL tell if the tenant will be short-term or not if the tenant doesn't want to reveal that? Especially in the new climate that will favour longer-term tenancies, tenants would learn to present themselves as long-term.

                                Is that not the professionalism of being a landlord eg judging the type of tenant and doing your references and checks? Whether you go eg for someone working a 12 month contract, or a couple with a 3 year old moving in near a primary school, or someone with a dog taking early retirement?

                                And how assiduously you follow up your refs. If they are a Kiwi, do you check their credit reference in NZ, and so on?

                                ML
                                Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

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