Pets causing eviction

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  • Wiffle
    replied
    Update:

    We've just been to view another property with the same letting agent (keeping our options are open) they are adamant they told the landlord about the dogs and are willing to provide emails to that effect. The agent who showed us around the new property was the same person who complied our 3 month property check and she was flabbergasted how a glowing report could result in the current situation we find ourselves in.

    We've requested a letter from the charity or letting agent giving us what they wish is to comply with, reason for the change to the tenancy, amount of notice to comply and formally requested a pow wow with all parties to see if meditation can bring this to an end. We warned the agent that we will be willing to take this as far as is needed (section 21) if resolve can't be reached through other means, they support us all the way.

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  • islandgirl
    replied
    Find their own emotive language (about why people should contribute to their charity and how kind and good they are) and quote it kindly in the letter

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  • DPT57
    replied
    I agree. If you write to the charity and explain all this, including emotive language about 'family members' etc then they or their PR dept may well have a change of heart.

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  • Wainwright
    replied
    Actually I wonder if you'd have more luck contacting the charity directly and explaining how you'd sought and were of the belief you had been granted permission by them to have the dogs? It's worth a shot....

    Chances are agent is telling them you moved them in without their consent/knowledge, something which in all probability annoyed them hence the recent instructions! I know I wouldn't like it if a T did this!

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  • mariner
    replied
    Did you get LLs prior written permission to keep pets?
    Was any restriction on type, breed and number required by LL for his consent or did you just move ou 'babies' in?
    Pets cannot be a T, but remain the property of the human Ts, with no Rights.
    If your LL is a Charity, I doubt you havemore than a ommercial AST.

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  • KTC
    replied
    They can't actually force you to give up your dogs. They can (attempt to) evict you.

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  • Wiffle
    replied
    Originally posted by Wainwright View Post
    At any rate it's a tad unreasonable to give someone 2 weeks to rehome their dogs.

    I don't know, but I'd be happier to let to people with pets (within reason, of course) than to those with children!! In my experience and those of other landlords I know, the latter have been far more problematic in terms of damage etc
    You join us and the letting agent in the same thought, does anyone know if there's a set limit of time they can request or is it something they can just make up as they go?

    I can echo that, my kids are all grown up now but my mediocre DIY skills have been called upon many more times for the kids than the dogs during the years.

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  • Wainwright
    replied
    At any rate it's a tad unreasonable to give someone 2 weeks to rehome their dogs.

    I don't know, but I'd be happier to let to people with pets (within reason, of course) than to those with children!! In my experience and those of other landlords I know, the latter have been far more problematic in terms of damage etc

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  • Wainwright
    replied
    Originally posted by JK0 View Post
    I bet letting agent never told landlord about dogs before letting, and they only found out when they got the inspection report.
    Ah! This is exactly what I was thinking as well.

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  • Wiffle
    replied
    Originally posted by KTC View Post
    Legal aside, "national charity" - well known?

    A bit of public pressure if you can get some traditional or social media attention may be enough for them to suddenly decide it was a "misunderstanding".
    ­čĄú Considered this but would rather find an amicable resolve before effectivity hurting the users of the charity. Pets are an emotive issue and charities get enough bad press, some justified, some not so although I'm sure the locals, nationals and social media would have a field day with something like this, makes you wonder just how many animals end up in shelters or destroyed as a result of the housing legislation in the UK.

    Thanks for clarity on where we stand, I'm still confused with the two week to get rid of request though, this surely can't be enforced (I'd love to see the bailiff try to take the dogs, my significant other is part Rottweiler ­čśé)

    As the others have said this is sounding like an admin error that we as tenants are left paying the price, sad but certainly a life lesson.

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  • cymro123
    replied
    Agree with JKO LA did not tell L but fast forward to the inspection the same forgetful LA or someone else working for the LA has 'let the cat out of the bag' in the inspection report. Only a bailiff acting with a warrant from the courts can evict you.

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  • JK0
    replied
    I bet letting agent never told landlord about dogs before letting, and they only found out when they got the inspection report.

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  • KTC
    replied
    Originally posted by Wiffle View Post
    They have also given us the heads up that the landlord would possibly not extend our tenancy beyond the initial 6 months effectivity negating the need for a section 21.
    No such thing. If you stay beyond the end of the fixed term, a statutory periodic tenancy automatically arise by law. If landlord want to evict, they must serve notice and go to court. (Not that this help you, since nothing stopping them from serving you s21 from month 4+ onwards.)

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  • KTC
    replied
    Legal aside, "national charity" - well known?

    A bit of public pressure if you can get some traditional or social media attention may be enough for them to suddenly decide it was a "misunderstanding".

    Leave a comment:


  • Wiffle
    replied
    Originally posted by Macromia View Post
    If you have a copy of the application you at least have evidence that you made the landlord aware that you had pets before agreeing the tenancy. Do you have anything that confirms that permission was granted?

    It is completely unreasonable for a landlord to agree that you can have pets before you sign an agreement and to then withdraw that agreement soon after the tenancy starts.

    Whether it is legal for them to start eviction proceedings if you don't get rid of your dogs is another matter. If you can't show that permission was given they may be able to evict by claiming a breach of the lease. If you can show evidence that you were granted permission they will likely find it difficult to withdraw this permission but will be able to pursue eviction after the initial tenancy period has ended, if not sooner - so you will only be able to delay eviction.
    Thanks again for your time and input.

    We don't have a copy of the application but will be requesting one from the letting agent asap. Both we and the letting agent agree that the landlord is being unreasonable and we wouldn't of even contemplated taking on the tenancy if the dogs weren't allowed. Luckily the letting agents have been amazing and very understanding, they have offered to let us view other properties that guarantee pets allowed. They have also given us the heads up that the landlord would possibly not extend our tenancy beyond the initial 6 months effectivity negating the need for a section 21.

    Lesson learnt abiet a very very expensive and emotional one!

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