Should a landlord provide means of connecting a cooker?

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    Should a landlord provide means of connecting a cooker?

    Moved in to a house without a cooker nor the basic connections to my install my own? There is a gas pipe near the space for a cooker however it's been capped off. Also there's no switch with a neon light for an electric cooker. Should either of these have been provided by the landlord?

    #2
    I suspect you have to pay to connect a cooker yourself. I think if there is a gas pipe, that should be fairly easy, shouldn't it?

    Comment


      #3
      So long as its done by a gas safe person -
      Check your tenancy agreement/speak to landlord and find out if your allowed it as i would be concerned that this would have to pass a gas safe certificate /??
      In the meantime use microwave

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by alice123 View Post
        i would be concerned that this would have to pass a gas safe certificate /??
        Even if there is only a capped off gas pipe and nothing else then the LL still needs an anual inspection and a Gas Safety Certificate for it.

        Presumably in this case there is also a gas meter which would also need an anual inspection even if not in use.

        Oddly though if the tenant provides their own gas appliances the LL is not responsible for the inspection of those, but is for parts of the installation/pipework.

        http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/faqtenant.htm

        Comment


          #5
          I think the HSE are rather confused about this. In this other leaflet, it says that landlord only has to ensure gas fittings (and flues) are maintained in a safe condition.

          Then the next paragraph mentions the annual safety check for each appliance & flue.

          http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg285.pdf

          Comment


            #6
            Whats the script for an electric cooker? Am I expected to pay for an electrician to install a cooker electrical circuit?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by JK0 View Post
              I think the HSE are rather confused about this. In this other leaflet, it says that landlord only has to ensure gas fittings (and flues) are maintained in a safe condition.

              Then the next paragraph mentions the annual safety check for each appliance & flue.
              Well leaflets are only leaflets, for the nity-grity it's best to go to the legislation direct.

              The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998
              Regulation 36, Duties of Landlords.
              http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1...lation/36/made

              Says in part (1)
              “relevant gas fitting” means—
              (a) any gas appliance (other than an appliance which the tenant is entitled to remove from the relevant premises) or any installation pipework installed in any relevant premises; and

              (b) any gas appliance or installation pipework which, directy or indirectly, serves the relevant premises and which either—
              (i) is installed in any part of premises in which the landlord has an estate or interest; or
              (ii) is owned by the landlord or is under his control,
              Then in parts (2) and (3)
              (2) Every landlord shall ensure that there is maintained in a safe condition—

              (a)any relevant gas fitting; and
              (b)any flue which serves any relevant gas fitting,

              so as to prevent the risk of injury to any person in lawful occupation or relevant premises.

              (3) Without prejudice to the generality of paragraph (2) above, a landlord shall—

              (a)ensure that each appliance and flue to which that duty extends is checked for safety within 12 months of being installed and at intervals of not more than 12 months since it was last checked for safety (whether such check was made pursuant to these Regulations or not);
              That's my bolding, but that says clearly in (2)(a) that any gas pipework, (capped off or not), has to be 'maintained in a safe condition'.
              So although (3)(a) does not actually require an anual check to pipework, you'll still have to show that it's 'maintained in a safe condition'.
              And the easiest way to do that would be to have it inspected regularly by a Gas Safe engineer.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Mexico14 View Post
                Whats the script for an electric cooker? Am I expected to pay for an electrician to install a cooker electrical circuit?
                If it's something that you want, and the LL agrees that you can do it, then yes you would be expected to pay.

                Unless of course you can persuade the LL that it's am improvement that he should make?

                Comment


                  #9
                  If it's a rental property with a kitchen you'd expect it to be ready to support a cooker/oven.
                  It's a bit like supplying a bathroom, but no bath.
                  When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                  Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by nukecad View Post

                    Well leaflets are only leaflets, for the nity-grity it's best to go to the legislation direct.

                    The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998
                    Regulation 36, Duties of Landlords.
                    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1...lation/36/made

                    Says in part (1)

                    Then in parts (2) and (3)

                    That's my bolding, but that says clearly in (2)(a) that any gas pipework, (capped off or not), has to be 'maintained in a safe condition'.
                    So although (3)(a) does not actually require an anual check to pipework, you'll still have to show that it's 'maintained in a safe condition'.
                    And the easiest way to do that would be to have it inspected regularly by a Gas Safe engineer.
                    I'm certainly not going to pay someone £90 every year to come & look at a pipe!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Its capped off because nothing is currently connected to it.
                      simple job for a gas safe registered person to remove the cap and connect a cooker to it.

                      I did mine myself 4 years ago that was capped off and has passed every annual test since so it really is simple...but obviously I can't recommend that.

                      So landlord has provided you with a point to install a cooker imo

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
                        If it's a rental property with a kitchen you'd expect it to be ready to support a cooker/oven.
                        It's a bit like supplying a bathroom, but no bath.
                        Wow, i would not have thought (until reading this) that a kitchen would come without a cooker of some sort !! My tenants clearly get the gold standard as i provide not just the Neff hob and Neff cooker but also the washing machine, separate dryer, fridge freezer and an inbuilt microwave.... some tenants really get a rough deal.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by JK0 View Post
                          I think the HSE are rather confused about this. In this other leaflet, it says that landlord only has to ensure gas fittings (and flues) are maintained in a safe condition.

                          http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg285.pdf
                          It doe not say "only".
                          It is the first bullet point in a series.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Hudson01 View Post

                            Wow, i would not have thought (until reading this) that a kitchen would come without a cooker of some sort !!
                            Social housing (around half of UK rental properties) rarely comes with a cooker;

                            https://england.shelter.org.uk/housi...ociation_homes

                            You're expected to provide your own:
                            • carpets
                            • furniture
                            • domestic appliances

                            You're responsible for repairing or replacing them.

                            Perhaps Shelter will run one of their campaigns to ban private landlords from providing cookers and carpets to bring them up to the 'gold standard' of social housing .




                            Comment


                              #15
                              I didn't say that the landlord has to provide cooking equipment (although I do, because my market expects it), but that a kitchen should be able to support cooking equipment (ie. be ready for something to be connected).
                              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                              Comment

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