Very poor credit score and renting

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    Very poor credit score and renting

    A friend of mine was looking at renting to someone who is on UC with 2 kids and has declared she has a CCJ for non-payment of rent which happened with her ex-partner. My friend was happy to go along with that as she declared it but then did a clearscore credit check (with the potential tenant's permission) and it came back as 140/700 which anything below 279 is considered very poor, also there was records of the person defaulting on non-rental things such as energy bills and telephone contracts. Anyway the landlady decided she didn't want to risk it.

    Anway in situations like this I was wondering what do you do with people who have very bad credit scores and history of defaulting wanting to rent?

    #2
    By ' what do you do ' what exactly do you mean ? I as a landlord would do nothing, i would decline them and that would be the end of it. Their best bet would be in social housing (if it can be found), i certainly would not take that chance and i know most of my friends who also are landlords would do the same. I do have an amount of sympathy for those in that position but with housing in short supply bad debt counts very badly against the person and i am unsure what options they have other than placing themselves at the charity of the local authority for temp housing if that is the situation they are in.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Hudson01 View Post
      By ' what do you do ' what exactly do you mean ?
      Just was wondering when is a good time to say no as some people suggest having a guarantor however guarantors often seem to get angry when asked to meet their financial obligations that they have signed up to guarantee. If I was in the landlord's position I would say no.

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        #4
        A Leopard never changes its spots even with a Personal Guarantor sitting behind them.It May be harsh but you may have a BtL Mortgage and the lender will show no sympathy if you default on your mortgage payments because your tenant with a proven history of non payment doesn’t pay and you are in a queue at the County Court seeking financial redress from the Guarantor. Simply say No and make no apology for your decision.

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          #5
          Originally posted by TypeUsername View Post

          Just was wondering when is a good time to say no as some people suggest having a guarantor however guarantors often seem to get angry when asked to meet their financial obligations that they have signed up to guarantee. If I was in the landlord's position I would say no.
          Guarantors are rarely given proper information about what they are taking on. I've had to be a guarantor for a student child - and the contract was not even provided before they moved in for one tenancy.

          If I was feeling kind I might direct them to some online advice on how to improve their credit score and suggest a visit to the CAB for financial advice.

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