The End of Section 21

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    #16
    Originally posted by michelle230 View Post
    Sick of hearing about rogue landlords.
    How about tackling one of the most serious offenders - housing associations. People living in damp and sometimes dangerous squalor in many of these HA properties while the HA rake huge profits.. Housing Associations are exempt from the same regulations that private landlords have to adhere to.
    I consider myself to be an excellent landlord, my properties are immaculate however I am thrown into the same tank as the landlords who have damp up their walls, don't fix anything and cause hell for their tenants. Why not incentivise me rather than restrict me further due to the usual - 'there's a few bad apples, let's over regulate them all'. Look at what the tories did to the police!

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      #17
      Originally posted by tatemono View Post
      he sounds like me actually and I'm far from a Tory minister. I can't see what decent LLs have to fear from this change. It's working in Scotland, is it not?
      Yes it's been this way in Scotland for a while now. I think section 8 has been strengthened to compensate.

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        #18
        Originally posted by tatemono View Post
        I can't see what decent LLs have to fear from this change.
        Have you ever evicted a tenant for ASB?

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          #19
          We have been landlords for 40 years. In the early days we only let to students knowing that they would eventually move on. Then the law changed and you could give your tenants notice if the property was furnished. In those days I advertised in a local paper and the phone rang off the hook.

          The law changed again to what it is now and more landlords came on the scene. The banks started offering buy to let mortgages, not available 40 years ago, encouraged no doubt that the mortgaged property could be easily made vacant if they needed their money back.

          Whilst I feel sorry for the renter's lack of security we landlords are not social housing. I think that this change to section 21 is a very bad move for tenantst and will result in even less property available to rent. The demand to rent for the landlords who stick with their business will increase again.

          I have only used a section 21 once on a tenant where our relationship had completely broken down although in other respects he was fine. Under this new act I would have had to have suffered him.

          We will wait and see how it goes. We are in our 70's now and if we get too many problems we will be selling up.

          I haven't seen much from the NLA of which I am a member.

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            #20
            I wonder what this would do to property prices, if loads of landlords sell up? Maybe the banks will prevail upon ministers to forget this, (similarly to Uber mysteriously retaining their London License.)

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              #21
              How does insulting me add to this conversation JKO? My opinion is as valid as yours even if you don't agree with it. I believe there are good and bad landlords & good and bad tenants. I strive to provide good quality homes to people who want one. All good landlords & tenants should welcome measures that push bad landlords & tenants and out of our industry. I hate the fact that all landlords are deemed rogue, money grabbing individuals but until we clean up our industry we will not improve our reputation.

              I also agree with Michelle230 - the scandal is that Housing Associations can operate to a lower standard than private landlords.

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                #22
                Originally posted by jpucng62 View Post
                How does insulting me add to this conversation JKO?
                I'm glad that you consider it an insult.

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                  #23
                  I consider myself a good landlord, my properties are well maintained and my rents are 10-15% below the market rate due to heavy discounts I give for good tenants.

                  If this comes in to Law, then I will no doubt be selling my properties and leave the rental Market.

                  Letting in UK has become such a minefield in the last 10 years, it has fast becoming more trouble than it's worth. One mis-step and everything blows up in your face.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by jpucng62 View Post
                    Good landlords have nothing to fear from this change in my opinion.
                    The issue is less about good LLs than about bad Ts.

                    For those of us who let to better-off, working, aspirational tenants, indeed we will have little to fear.

                    But for those who let to people with little stake in their own future, it is a different issue.

                    Unfortunately it is once again likely to be those worst off in society that will suffer, with LLs even less likely to let to those on benefits. Except, of course, for the criminal LLs, who will ignore the law and just send the boys round anyway.

                    What is needed is investment from Government in social housing (so those deserving of it are not placed in the private sector) and investment from Government in enforcement (so that Authorities have the resources to tackle the criminal and bad LLs in their areas)

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                      #25
                      It's too true, I pride myself on being a good landlord, providing good accommodation and dealing with problems swiftly. I try to work with my tenants and in turn they are happy to see me when I turn up. Everyone is happy, now we are all being put in the same basket as those landlords that are basically crooks ! and being told you need to fix up

                      And no thought is given to tenants that decide to withhold rent and make ridiculous demands and lies towards their landlord, what's the defence going to say.

                      Well you are a landlord you just need to suffer it, nice!

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by michelle230 View Post
                        Sick of hearing about rogue landlords.
                        How about tackling one of the most serious offenders - housing associations. People living in damp and sometimes dangerous squalor in many of these HA properties while the HA rake huge profits.. Housing Associations are exempt from the same regulations that private landlords have to adhere to.
                        My understanding is that housing associations are not allowed to distribute profits, so profits can only go into more housing or improving existing housing.

                        (There may be a valid argument about senior executive salaries, of coruse.)

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                          #27
                          My immediate reaction was that it removes the main route for dealing with sub-tenant breaches of superior in the, I suspect, common case that the tenancy agreement fails to include the conditions in the superior lease. I think the normal relief from forfeiture in that case would be that the landlord remove the tenant as soon as legally possible.

                          It also seems to remove the main way of dealing with low level anti-social behaviour, dealing with which is a condition of typical licensing schemes. Government austerity means the threshold for formal community protection notices, etc., is going to be quite high, as councils won't have the finds to deal with them.

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                            #28
                            leaseholder64 I'm sure they find somewhere to put their profits but it's not into their tenants properties 🙄

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by spiritdreams View Post
                              I consider myself a good landlord, my properties are well maintained and my rents are 10-15% below the market rate due to heavy discounts I give for good tenants.

                              If this comes in to Law, then I will no doubt be selling my properties and leave the rental Market.

                              Letting in UK has become such a minefield in the last 10 years, it has fast becoming more trouble than it's worth. One mis-step and everything blows up in your face.
                              Pretty much the same here, except I've been selling anyway. . Doesnt matter if you have never needed to use S21 - the knowledge that it is possible operates to prevent tenants being too unreasonable. What they should be doing is making revenge evictions far more difficult. They could increase the period of notice required for s21, an additional two months would give people a full school term and would be a decent trade off for enhanced S8. Could increase it further if there was no possibility of further extension by the courts.

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                                #30
                                There is a solution:

                                The govt should leave ASTs alone and legislate a new type of "secure tenancy" alongside the existing AST regime.

                                The secure tenancy would be for at least 3 years and have no s.21.

                                The law would require the landlord to provide "a how to rent" leaflet explaining the difference between a "secure tenancy" and an AST before signing up the tenant and the landlord must in all advertising and on the face of the agreement indicate which type it is. Any landlord who fails to comply automatically has the agreement converted to a "secure tenancy" by law.

                                Tenants will generally prefer secure tenancies. LL will prefer ASTs. LL who offer secure tenancies will be able to charge more and be able to pick the best tenants because secure tenacies will be fewer. Secure tenacies will face competition from home ownership. If they are too expensive or hard to come by, people will have the option to buy instead. Tenants who don't care about security will save money by opting for an AST instead.

                                LL who offer ASTs will have more flexibility but also more competition. They will charge lower rents and only get to pick from the tenants left over after all the secure tenancies are filled. Market forces will put pressure on LL to offer secure tenancies if they want better tenants and more rent.

                                The market will decide on the balance of offerings to suit tenant demand.

                                A 2 tier system like this already exists with council housing running alongside PRS and works no problem. Everybody knows the difference so why not use this in the private rental sector?

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