Opinions on this brickwork

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    Opinions on this brickwork

    This is the condition of the kitchen wall from the outside. On the inside is black mould developing. The landlord claims their engineer says the damp is due to "condensation". 1) I don't recall their engineer ever visiting 2) that looks like broken brickwork letting damp though?
    kitchen wall

    #2
    Mexico, if you are so unhappy with your landlord's registration, the brickwork, the heating, and the guttering, why don't you just move?

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      #3
      It depends if that brickwork is above or below the damp course.

      Get a damp proofing company to give you a quote for fixing the damp inside.
      That'll give you a clue what the cause is.
      Don't tell them you're a tenant, just that this is your first winter in the place.

      And, seriously, JKO has a point.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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        #4
        Is it a solid wall or a cavity wall?

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          #5
          Solid wall

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            #6
            So DPC may have failed/never installed.

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              #7
              Originally posted by JK0 View Post
              Mexico, if you are so unhappy with your landlord's registration, the brickwork, the heating, and the guttering, why don't you just move?
              If these issues are sorted it'll be fine. Guessing at it's the first time the house has been rented out he didn't realise these things had to be resolved? Got to give people the benefit of the doubt and assist them with correct diagnosis. Or I could let them damp takeover the house and not say a word - would he be happy with that?

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                #8
                Write (yes, write..) to landlord, copy agent, keep copy using process and draft letter from Shelter here regarding any repair issues...
                https://england.shelter.org.uk/housi...ivate_landlord
                I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                  #9
                  Black mould is usually caused by pure water, such as condensation, steam etc. Brickwork does look like it's holding water though, where is the damp course?

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                    #10
                    To my untrained eye there isn't one. As I understand its usually a dark grey/black layer around a foot off the ground?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Mexico14 View Post
                      On the inside is black mould developing.
                      Damp in a victorian terraced house is a big issue to take on. It took me several months of analysis without a tenant in the house to fix the problem and a good wedge of cash. Most problems will be sorted by fixing the roof, chimney flashings and gutters. You will also need heat and ventilation ( another issue for you I believe) inside the property to dry it out once fixed . You may be lucky and find that it is just a gutter needing to be cleared or a broken downpipe pouring water down the wall , the latter being a detail outlined in a previous post of yours. Take a walk outside when it is raining hard and see where the water goes.

                      There is a book called ' The Rising Damp Myth' which is discredited by the DPC industry but if you believe that the DPC and condensation in a house may not be the problem causing the damp, then you then are left with looking for another reason. You will have engineers, builders, surveyors possibly giving varying and conflicting reasons for the damp; you have already expressed scepticism at one 'expert' report so where do you go from here?

                      In a previous post I suggested if you are not happy in this house you should leave as soon as possible. The issues you outline potentially need someone to recognise and fix the problems, which does not look very likely, and so I repeat my advice for you to look for somewhere else to live.

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                        #12
                        The landlord is being very awkward. Refusing to surrender the tenancy. What can I do? Also noticed a crack in the south wall. The previous pics of from the west wall. What course of action is needed to stop the penetrating damp and price?

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                          #13
                          Call the Council Environmental Health Officer. If the defects are sufficiently problematic they will write to the landlord.

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                            #14
                            Damp proof course may not be as high as a foot above the ground - looks to me as if it's 2 bricks up as the bricks below that are in much worse condition. Also looks like there has been a lot of water there, perhaps from the leaking gutter you apparently mentioned elsewhere or that little gully that runs nearby could be overflowing in heavy rain..

                            Mould on the inside could be condensation in a house with poor insulation and inadequate heating. Running a dehumidifier (proper electric one not the rubbish small ones) would make the house feel more comfortable.

                            Get 3 companies round to look at mould and you'll get at least 3 opinions on the cause and they may all be wrong. I know in one property it turned out to be a leaking central heating system, leak was under the floor so took a long time to sort that one. Try a foil test https://basementhealth.org/how-to-de...ion-on-a-wall/

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Mexico14 View Post
                              This is the condition of the kitchen wall from the outside. On the inside is black mould developing. The landlord claims their engineer says the damp is due to "condensation". 1) I don't recall their engineer ever visiting 2) that looks like broken brickwork letting damp though?
                              How old is the property? When built? Pre 1840's DPC was not usually installed in properties. There is no such thing as damp apparently it's a UK idea...to sell people DPC's. In older properties they tended to have breathable walls and paint on either side. There could be a condensation problem penetrating damp problem or something else like guttering or pointing issues. You need a surveyor to assess and go from there. Check out Peter Cox on You tube he is an expert

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