Inventories. Process and obligation.

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    Inventories. Process and obligation.

    Hi all. I've recently had a inventory and check in performed by an inventory clerk. I self manage.

    I'm feeling like the clerk may have let me down but wanted to see what is typical.

    The clerk is a one man band. His inventory template has a declarations and signatures box near the start of the document which states things like "accepting that this is a true and fair representation...". They have boxes for "tenants" and another which says "inventory clerk/managing agent/landlord". He has failed to sign this box despite being the person who performed the inventory, drew up the document and did the check in with the tenant.


    I have used an independent professional to carry out the inventory in the understanding I'll be in a better position should their be a dispute at the end of the tenancy due to their perceived impartially. My concern is that if I as landlord sign then I'm weakening this .

    Would this matter to an adjudicator or am I writingw about nothing?


    #2
    An adjudicator would not care whether it was signed by the LL, his agent, or a gorilla who'd been on a one-day inventory-writing course, in my experience. More significant is whether the tenant has signed the inventory at check in or soon after, as being an accurate record at the start of the tenancy.

    Ideally the written inventory should be accompanied by a shedload of digital photographs, dated, which can be used at the end of the tenancy as the basis of any claim. All the adjudicator will be interested in is whether you can demonstrate that the tenant has left the property or its contents in a worse state (disregarding fair wear and tear) than when they moved in.

    Inventory writing does not require any special training or talent, by the way. I once matched the skills needed to the National Curriculum in English and Maths) and they came out at something like Level 2 (expected of the average 7 year old) - things like ability to count and record discrete objects, to sort them into groups and match, etc, then write short accurate descriptions of said objects. There's no mystique. If you don't like the one the 'professional' has produced, do your own.

    My one tip would be : don't forget the skirting boards.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      Inspect the property youself using the Inspector's completed report.
      ADR dislike photo's, other than for major defects/general layout. They prefer reports in writing. Close ups distort scale.
      Wait to see if our regular Inventory Clerk replies.

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        #4
        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
        An adjudicator would not care whether it was signed by the LL, his agent, or a gorilla who'd been on a one-day inventory-writing course, in my experience. More significant is whether the tenant has signed the inventory at check in or soon after, as being an accurate record at the start of the tenancy.
        Granted the tenants signature is the most important single factor but that doesn't mean it's everything.
        Ok but I've heard many times that is better come adjudication time if an inventory is "done" by an independent clerk. I suppose my question is what done means? Is it performed, written up, check in or signature?. Perhaps all of the above?


        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
        inventory writing does not require any special training or talent, by the way. I once matched the skills needed to the National Curriculum in English and Maths) and they came out at something like Level 2 (expected of the average 7 year old) - things like ability to count and record discrete objects, to sort them into groups and match, etc, then write short accurate descriptions of said objects. There's no mystique. If you don't like the one the 'professional' has produced, do your own.
        Am eye for detail, pedanticism and ability to create and follow a process with utter consistency. Those are key imo and are life skills/character traits not learnt in a classroom

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          #5
          Originally posted by mariner View Post
          Inspect the property youself using the Inspector's completed report.

          Wait to see if our regular Inventory Clerk replies.
          It's too late for that. The clerk sat on the report for the best part of 2 weeks before sending it to me....

          If I were to sign off against the report I'd want to make a couple of amendments to things I consider wrong. I have to be honest though I have no idea what the process would be given that T has already signed hence it wouldn't seem right to alter or annotate the document in any way.

          Hope the regular inventory clerk does reply with their wisdom.

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