Rent Increase

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    Rent Increase

    My tenant moved in on 14/2/03 on 6 month ast and was given new tenancy from 16/8/03 - 15/8/04, it hasn't been renewed since.

    From what date can I give notice of my intention to increase the rent, and how much notice do I have to give before the increase takes effect? i.e. does the notice have to be given on a rent day etc (she pays monthly)

    The rent is still the same from when she moved in originally.

    #2
    Your tenant is on a statutory periodic tenancy and at least one month's notice of a rent increase is required. The noitice, I think it is under section 13, must be on the correct form to advise the tenant what action to take if she objects to the increase. Once the rent has been increased no further increases can be made for a year. If the original AST made provision for rent reviews, then they must be made in accordance with the provisions of the original AST.

    P.P.
    Any information given in this post is based on my personal experience as a landlord, what I have learned from this and other boards and elsewhere. It is not to be relied on. Definitive advice is only available from a Solicitor or other appropriately qualified person.

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      #3
      Nobody uses the S.13 route under such circumstances. If there is provision for a rent increase in the latest AST, not I might add the original, then you can implement this. It would be unfair however to give less than two months notice of any such increase as the tenant has to be given reasonable time to reject it, and to make alternative arrangements by ending the current AST.

      The easiest way is to bring the current AST to an end by the service of a S.21 Notice and tell the tenant you might consider an application for a new tenancy at an increased rent! Either way you get the exisiting, or a new tenant, at a higher rent, providing you haven't priced yourself out of the marketplace!
      The advice I give should not be construed as a definitive answer, and is without prejudice or liability. You are advised to consult a specialist solicitor or other person of equal legal standing.

      Comment

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