EPC Exemptions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    EPC Exemptions

    Good afternoon,
    I’m not sure if you can help me directly or put me in the right direction of someone that can.
    I am in the last stages of buying a property in the UK.
    That property has an EPC of “F”.
    It is over 200 years old and has solid floors and solid walls (ie no cavity)
    The present owner is not registered as a landlord, however I would want to let the house.
    My lender, will not complete unless the EPC is “E” (which it CANNOT reach) or it is registered as an exemption.
    Is the present owner allowed to register an exemption even if he does NOT have the house rented out and does not intend to ?
    I understand that any exemption does not extend over to me as a new owner, but it WOULD be acceptable proof to my lender.
    I’m not sure if I’ve explained myself fully or clearly enough, but do look forward to any advice you can give.
    Thanks in advance and best regards,

    #2
    I'd forget about buying the place IIWY. Those standards are getting tighter all the time.
    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

    Comment


      #3
      But surely there are 100s of thousands of rental properties that don't come up to the "E" rating at the moment and that can't be "improved". What will happen to all of those ?

      Comment


        #4
        That property doesn't sound suitable for letting

        That exemption is designed for listed buildings or buildings in conservation areas - which cannot be brought up to an appropriate level.
        Neither of those types of property are suitable for non-specialist letting.
        I'm amazed a BTL lender will proceed at all.

        This is new and relatively untested legislation, and I doubt you'll find a local authority prepared to enter something onto the PRS exemptions register.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment


          #5
          where on the scale is it? what are the recommendations? if the recommendations say it wont reach any higher than it is, then walk away, you may love the property, BUT its a business decision. so unless there is a compelling reason to buy it, then look to invest elsewhere.

          Comment


            #6
            There are certain situations where an EPC is not required. These are:
            • A building that is officially protected as being a Listed building on the Historic England (or Welsh equivalent).
            • A building used as a place of worship or religious activities
            • A temporary building with a planned time of use of two years or less
            • Industrial sites, workshops or non-residential agricultural buildings

            EPCs are also not required if the property is let on a licence. Licences are not the same as tenancies and a licence is not considered to be a tenancy for the purposes of the energy regulations. A tenancy grants exclusive possession of the property, while a licence grants permission for a licensee to do something on the property. Holiday homes and lodger arrangements are let under a licence to occupy rather than a tenancy. You should speak to your solicitor about this - urgently before proceeding further with the sale.

            Comment

            Latest Activity

            Collapse

            Working...
            X