Newish LL asking about why tenants wants a three year rent period.

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    #16
    It looks like the three year tenancy thing isn't going to be pushed ahead by the government. I'm in two minds about it. On the one hand it doesn't seem fair - contractually - but on the other hand I want my tenants to stay in my property for as long as possible and if I had to get them out there would be a legitimate reason for it.

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      #17
      Speaking as a parent here - you have to be totally lacking in empathy not to appreciate that a family with a child or children doesnt want to uproot them from friends every 12 months. It's disruptive. The parents may have babysitting networks. they dont want the hassle and expense of moving. So they want to be in one place long term. Also you cant sign up for 2 year energy fixes if you have a rolling contract, or at least not without potentially having to pay exit fees.

      Offer them a 2 year contract with a 12 month break clause or they may go looking for someone who will.

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        #18
        Originally posted by buzzard1994 View Post
        Speaking as a parent here - you have to be totally lacking in empathy not to appreciate.....
        I think we can all appreciate that, the problem is the higher risk involved with evicting a bad tenant within the fixed period.

        Offer them a 2 year contract with a 12 month break clause or they may go looking for someone who will.
        Good luck to them finding a competent landlord who will offer that.

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          #19
          Originally posted by boletus View Post
          Good luck to them finding a competent landlord who will offer that.
          absolutely. As with shares, past behaviour of a tenant is no guarantee of future performance.

          There are just too many variables in life for any of us to predict our lives over the next two years.

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            #20
            Originally posted by boletus View Post

            Good luck to them finding a competent landlord who will offer that.
            Depends where you are - my student child in London has met landlords very keen to have long contracts. I wouldnt let them sign up for more than 12 months because there are many bad landlords. They recently renewed with their second landlord (nothing wrong with the first landlord either but the flat was ex council and had difficult neighbours).

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              #21
              Originally posted by buzzard1994 View Post
              - my student child in London has met landlords very keen to have long contracts.
              As said;
              Good luck to them finding a competent landlord who will offer that.

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                #22
                Originally posted by boletus View Post

                As said;
                Good luck to them finding a competent landlord who will offer that.
                Current landlord offered a longer contract - and they are competent as a landlord. However they dont operate at the bottom of the market.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by buzzard1994 View Post

                  Current landlord offered a longer contract - and they are competent as a landlord.
                  Student lets are a different kettle of fish.

                  As a competent landlord yourself, how long do you usually offer on initial tenancies?

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                    #24
                    boletus,

                    OP wasnt asking about an initial tenancy, it's a renewal - and I'd offer a 2 year contract with a break clause if they've been good tenants.

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                      #25
                      If I've had good tenants I tell them they can stay as long as both they & I are happy.

                      And my happiness includes having rent paid in-full-on-time, place looked after, no (valid) complaints from neighbours. And so perioidic gives us both the best flexibility - plus NO BLEEDIN' paperwork!
                      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                        #26
                        another vote for periodic...it's what I do after an initial 6 month contract
                        Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by buzzard1994 View Post

                          Current landlord offered a longer contract - and they are competent as a landlord.
                          Unless well-paid Mummy and Daddy with a PPR are firmly on the hook as guarantors, I'd question that competency.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by buzzard1994 View Post
                            They recently renewed with their second landlord (nothing wrong with the first landlord either but the flat was ex council and had difficult neighbours).
                            That's a different problem right there. The tenants want the security of a long contract but the flexibility to move when they want.

                            This is one of those problems that (seems to me) to be very local. Where rents increase pretty continually and by reasonable amounts, there's a tendency for landlords to evict tenants - either directly to bring in new higher paying tenants or indirectly, by increasing the rent to the point that the tenants have to move. In that scenario, I can see tenants being insecure and wanting a longer term without a rent increase*.

                            Where I let, the market rate is fairly static (a small percentage increase is reported, but in reality properties are advertised today at the same rate as they were several years ago). So there's no landlord benefit in moving decent tenants on. A tenant who pays their rent is probably only slightly less secure then someone who owns their own home - the chances of me having some kind of life changing event that causes their lease to end aren't that much more likely than the same thing happening to the tenant.

                            Whether they feel that way, of course, I don't know.

                            *This is most common in London and the SE. I.e. where most of the politicians and media are based.
                            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by jpkeates View Post

                              This is one of those problems that (seems to me) to be very local. Where rents increase pretty continually and by reasonable amounts, there's a tendency for landlords to evict tenants -either directly to bring in new higher paying tenants or indirectly, by increasing the rent to the point that the tenants have to move.

                              *This is most common in London and the SE. I.e. where most of the politicians and media are based.
                              Some of mine are in the SE and I've never once come across a landlord directly evicting for that reason, or anywhere else for that matter. It just doesn't make any financial sense. (Increasing the rent to reflect market rates, well that's life.)

                              For every direct eviction I bet there is an underlying issue;
                              Late rent payment, annoying the neighbours, ASB, drugs, not looking after the property etc.
                              And the property will naturally be re-advertised at a higher rent (existing tenants pay less than new tenants).
                              So every disgruntled tenant will claim they were evicted just because the greedy landlord wanted more rent.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by boletus View Post
                                Some of mine are in the SE and I've never once come across a landlord directly evicting for that reason, or anywhere else for that matter. It just doesn't make any financial sense. (Increasing the rent to reflect market rates, well that's life.
                                I used to think that too.
                                In fact I've made the same argument on here in the past.

                                But then someone showed me an interesting graphic.
                                Areas of highest use of s21 notices and areas with highest rates of rent increase adjusted for population.
                                The areas with the highest rate of rent rise had a disproportionately high level of s21 notices.

                                Obviously there's a lot of other things that could impact the figures - the figures on notices come from the courts, so they relate to disputed notices or at least one's not complied with, which could simply be a result of the tenant not being able to comply when rents around them are rising sharply - or simply wanting a few more weeks/months at a lower rent.

                                But, overall, it changed my mind.

                                When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                                Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                                Comment

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