Prohibition Order v Housing Laws

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Prohibition Order v Housing Laws

    My local authority has issued me with a prohibition order for one of my units of accommodation
    For being user sized
    The tenant has an AST with another year left on the contract
    I can't evict the tenant as the rent is being paid on time
    Does the prohibition order law exceed housing law in a law of court?

    #2
    Do you mean by "user sized" it is too small? If so how many people, what size bedrooms please?

    Is it a HMO -- either needing a license or not.

    You I think still have to house them:. Somewhere else.

    Maybe bribe them to move.
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

    Comment


      #3
      I think you mean under sized. I had this in an HMO where one room was found to be mere inches too small (rules is rules!); luckily I had a spare room to swap the tenants to but I flogged the house soon after. You'd best explain to the tenant what the new situation is and see if they leave voluntarily. If they refuse... council won't be able to fine you if the tenant stays but you're going through an eviction process.

      Comment


        #4
        If the whole of the property covered by the tenancy was statutorily overcrowded, from the beginning, both the tenant and landlord can be prosecuted. The exemption whilst going through eviction only applies if the situation arose through unforeseen circumstances.

        If it just breaks the local HMO regulations, I don't know the the way it should be handled.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by AnthonyLHD View Post
          Does the prohibition order law exceed housing law in a law of court?
          You need to find the tenant suitable alternative accommodation so you comply with your housing law obligations, otherwise the fines from the local authority might be punitive.

          Or buy the tenant out of their tenancy.
          When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
          Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

          Comment

          Latest Activity

          Collapse

          Working...
          X