Landlord Dispute over bleeding rads HELP!

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    #16
    So, the landlord should tell the tenants not to do it.
    The tenant isn't to know the central heating doesn't have a mechanism to top up the pressure and bleeding radiators is a routine activity.

    And in this case, bleeding the radiators didn't cause a pressure issue as far as we know.

    If the heating system is possibly going to lose pressure, a small tank can be added to maintain it - which would be sensible given that we've found the only student in history with a radiator key!

    When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
    Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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      #17
      Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
      So, the landlord should tell the tenants not to do it.
      The tenant isn't to know the central heating doesn't have a mechanism to top up the pressure and bleeding radiators is a routine activity.

      And in this case, bleeding the radiators didn't cause a pressure issue as far as we know.

      If the heating system is possibly going to lose pressure, a small tank can be added to maintain it
      You are right, the LL should point out that bleeding radiators is actually a semi skilled job, and should be left to someone capable.

      There is nothing routine about low pressure and a boiler not working. It doesn't take much air being bled to stop the boiler from working.

      Fitting a tank to maintain water pressure!! That is what the mains supply is for.

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        #18
        I've got such a tank on my own system.

        For years we had an undetectable leak "somewhere underground" that kept losing pressure, and a fairly standard looking reservoir was added to keep the pressure where it needed to be.
        There's a connection to the mains with a valve that's normally closed (to fill the system when necessary) but otherwise, it's a closed system.

        A while later the hidden "underground" leak started to run down a wall from upstairs, when someone inadvertently increased the pressure in the system too much causing the tiny leak to become bigger, but anyway...
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
          I've got such a tank on my own system.
          Most pressurised systems have an expansion tank to regulate the pressure - and with a modern combi-boiler, that will be inside the boiler, itself. Unless it is fed from the mains, with a pressure-sensitive non-return valve, it's hard to see how any tank can maintain pressure - it is usually there to allow for hot water to expand, without the pressure rising too much. Water regulations require a pressurised system to be decoupled from the water supply to prevent the contents of the system flowing back into the supply of potable water, so if it is permanently connected, it is almost certainly in breach of those regulations.

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            #20
            I suspect the vast majority of people do not disconnect the filling loop between uses (although I do).

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              #21
              Almost all technology is now made in China:
              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                #22
                Danny1994 refer your LL to court case of Warren v Keen in 1953, which is still applicable today, subject to H&S considerations. In the judges summing up of the case Lord Denning stated that.

                "The tenant must take proper care of the premises. He must, if he is going away for the winter, turn off the water and empty the boiler; he must clean the chimneys when necessary and also the windows; he must mend the electric light when it fuses; he must unstop the sink when it is blocked by his waste. In short, he must do the little jobs around the place which a reasonable tenant would do. In addition, he must not, of course damage the house wilfully or negligently ...but, apart from such things, if the house falls into disrepair through fair wear and tear or lapse of time or for any reason not caused by him, the tenant is not liable to repair it."

                As you have the knowledge and experience of bleeding the radiators, you deemed it one of the small jobs that you were liable for and as a result got on with it.

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                  #23
                  I'm sick of reading about the 'bleeding rads'.

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