Broken tables

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  • Broken tables

    Hi all
    My tenant is leaving the property and he told me that he accidentally broke two glass tables.
    Do I just replace them and ask for the money back, or can I look for the same tables and ask him for the money for those but not actually buy them? I don't think my new tenant wants the tables therefore I can do with getting the money but not buying them.

    Please let me know.

    Thank you

  • #2
    Broke how?

    Glass lasts forever pretty much if properly cared for, so I don't think you need to discount for wear and tear (apart from the legs potentially). I think you can claim for new glass tops only. You do not have to "actually" buy them.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
      Broke how?

      Glass lasts forever pretty much if properly cared for, so I don't think you need to discount for wear and tear (apart from the legs potentially). I think you can claim for new glass tops only. You do not have to "actually" buy them.
      He kicked them apparently!! And I have a message from him confirming he broke them.

      So how do I find the price I should charge him for the two glass tables?

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      • #4
        If they are missing at move out, IMO you can claim original cost less FW&T allowance using 10? years for life expectancy.
        Personally I would not include glass tables in any Tenancy

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mariner View Post
          If they are missing at move out, IMO you can claim original cost less FW&T allowance using 10? years for life expectancy.
          Personally I would not include glass tables in any Tenancy
          They were actually in the property when I bought it so I am using them for my tenants. So I don;t have a receipt... Therefore I am thinking best to find some similar tables and ask them to pay for them? Even if I don't buy them?

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          • #6
            So what is your loss?
            The next T app does not want them and may require removal at your expense.

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            • #7
              Ah, forget it. If the guy gets rid of the legs, I'd leave it at that.

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              • #8
                You are entitled to claim for your loss, minus wear and tear. As you paid £0.00 for them, you are entitled to ask him for £0.00, minus wear and tear. I figure that to be £0.00
                I may be a housing professional but my views, thoughts, opinions, advice, criticisms or otherwise on this board are mine and are not representative of my company, colleagues, managers. I am here as an independent human being who simply wants to learn new stuff, share ideas and interact with like minded people.

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                • #9
                  Presumably the purchase price of the property included the tables so you might be able to argue that they did have a cost to you, but I'm not sure how you would calculate it. I would informally ask him to contribute toward the cost of a couple of new non-glass tables

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Darth Wookie View Post
                    You are entitled to claim for your loss, minus wear and tear. As you paid £0.00 for them, you are entitled to ask him for £0.00, minus wear and tear. I figure that to be £0.00
                    Purchase price is totally irrelevant - value is relevant (and loss of value). Sometimes they are related.

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                    • #11
                      AD is correct. Whilst a receipt showing price and date of purchase can be helpful, how you came upon the tables is irrelevant. Whether you dragged them out of a skip or stupidly paid ten times their value, your actual loss caused by the tenant is exactly the same.

                      In this case, I would probably get a quote for repair and another for replacement. Submit both and make a deduction for the cost of the cheaper option. If repair is cheaper then that is straightforward because it is unlikely to leave you in a better position than at the start of the tenancy. If replacement is cheaper (and you might well be able to replace it with a second hand version) then present replacement as mitigation for the uneconomical cost of repair.

                      It's largely irrelevant what you were going to do with the tables afterwards but if you were just going to chuck them then it suggests that they weren't up to much and gives you scope to cut T some slack.

                      I had this once with an antique table (Ercol, 1950/60s). It had been in excellent condition but when handed back the top was badly scratched (used like a bread board) and stained. I was quoted £275 to restore the top (including cost to collect and return) but was able to buy a similar condition replacement on eBay for just over £200. Sale of the damaged one covered transportation costs.
                      Assume I know nothing.

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                      • #12
                        Have they left yet and if so were they a good tenant or not? How big were these tables?

                        I'd cost replacements and then let them have that cost less a generous allowance for wear and tear. They may just agree to pay.

                        if they havent gone yet you might indicate that if everything else is in excellent condition you'll forget it. Make sure the glass has been properly cleaned up though.

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