Creating a roof terrace

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  • mk1fan
    replied
    I would establish the legal use of the terrace with the Planners first the get the structure / handrail details approved by Building Control.

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  • negativegravity
    replied
    Many thanks. The joists in the roof are conveniently flooring joists and will easily withstand the weight (jointer checked when he was round doing another job). Many thanks for the advice on the four year rule. I'll go down this path.

    Cheers

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  • mk1fan
    replied
    If it's a terrace then you're unlikely to get planning consent for a fresh application.

    However if you can establish it's use for the last four years then you would get consent under an application using the four year rule. Alternatively, start collating evidence from now and apply in four years and one months time.

    Moving on from that, a garage roof would [most likely] need to be re structured to support a terrace / use as a terrace which would require Building Regulation Approval.

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  • andybenw
    replied
    Even though double doors open out onto the flat roof, the fact it is covered in felt and that there are no barriers clearly shows it is not presently a roof terrace. Therefore you will require planning permission as roof terraces are not permitted developement.

    Roofing rafters are normally much smaller and weaker than flooring joists, and it is highly likely the roof will require strengthening. You should be concerned about the roof covering as Sad S has stated.

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  • doobrey
    replied
    Originally posted by negativegravity View Post
    double doors which open out onto the flat roof of a large garage... ...Where do I stand on this?
    At the edges. Carefully.

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  • negativegravity
    replied
    Yep, own the whole building and it's not flats. Part of a terraced street.
    Do you mean that I should apply for a certificate of lawfulness?

    Cheers

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  • Sad S
    replied
    Is the house divided into flats? if so, planning would definitely be required. Ask planning authority if permission would be required in the case of a house used as a single dwelling. Unless you've got good evidence, it's unlikely that a certificate of lawfulness would be issued.

    Not a good idea to plonk deckchairs, tables, feet on a flat roof covered in felt - it will be damaged and tear - better to board the roof over. Fencing would be a good idea to stop falls, but would have to satisfy building regulations,

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  • negativegravity
    started a topic Creating a roof terrace

    Creating a roof terrace

    Hi all,
    I realise this topic has been discussed before but just wanted to double check.
    I purchased a house last year and I'm the freeholder. The rear bathroom on the first floor has double doors which open out onto the flat roof of a large garage. I've been informed by neighbours that the doors have been there for at least 10 years.

    I was hoping, since two of the three components required for a roof terrace exist (access and a flat roof), that I could erect some sort of fencing around the outside (safety first!). Was considering glass to keep it minimal. Neighbours on either side don't mind at all.

    Where do I stand on this? (Hopefully on a terrace). Do I need planning permission do you think?
    Cheers

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