Can I develop this (London) land?

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    Can I develop this (London) land?

    Hi all

    We live in a leafy part of Greater London, and happen to have a very large rear garden. It's often suggested that we sell it for development.

    Planning in the area means probably only a few houses could be built: certainly no flats or anything high rise. Now a neighbour's house has just come up for sale. They have a large garden which partially borders ours: but the shared border is fairly small.

    You can see here, us in green and the house for sale in red. Does it seems worth it to buy the neighbour's house, or is the link between the two lands too tenuous to be of use for a development of 4 to 5 houses? They also have a garage that can be taken down to provide access, without demolishing their actual house - so makes it more viable.

    Best

    London boy

    plots1.jpg

    #2
    Sounds like a good idea to me.

    Why not sound out your neighbour about a partnership, and apply for permission jointly? Then if you don't get consent, you won't have an extra house to dispose of.

    Comment


      #3
      Access and parking looks like it will be a big problem with a 20 m wide lot even taking the garage down. Objection from the neighbours. Any precedent?

      Comment


        #4
        You need to be careful here. The whole matter will depend on what the Council says in its planning policies. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) says that Councils can adopt anti-garden development policies if they so wish, so be aware of this too. Check on whether it is a conservation area. As well as policy there are practical matters like access, which looks not to easy on this site. I would say (as a planner and non-agent) that if you can buy this house for a good existing value and which, if all turns pear shaped, you can get a good rental on it, then that's fine. But be careful spending a huge premium to get it...too many risks involved... Regards, Peter

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          #5
          Can't imagine the neighbours will be too thrilled. What line does your planning department take on 'backlands development'?



          Freedom at the point of zero............

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            #6
            I agree with 4 and 5 this sort of backland development is often frowned on, not to mention the strain on existing roads and access to and from.

            Have a look at your local plan on your local council website under planning.

            I'd tend to look at an under croft for access to the rear and do a conversion into flats and an extension for new build flats, and the key pint will be not simply upset neighbours now being overlooked but the effect on traffic in the road and whether it can handle say 5 to 10 extra cars and the turning in in and out.
            Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

            Comment


              #7
              Hi all

              Turns out the potential purchase has more land than we thought - see below, their house comes with an adjacent plot so, their revised land in red, and us in green. What do you think? For the same money their plot is even bigger than expected:

              plots3.jpg

              Comment


                #8
                Well, you know I'm in favour. Did you sound out your neighbour about a partnership?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Well the neighbour (i.e. chap selling) basically wants to sell up and go - unless you mean one of the inbetween neighbours?

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                    #10
                    I envisage major objections by the neighbours. I certainly wouldn't want 4 or 5 houses in my back garden. I would be surprised if it was passed by planning. Best of luck.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      How much will council make in new revenue - that is bound to influence things.



                      Freedom at the point of zero............

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by bbva View Post
                        I envisage major objections by the neighbours. I certainly wouldn't want 4 or 5 houses in my back garden. I would be surprised if it was passed by planning. Best of luck.
                        Objection by the neighbours doesn't matter. Planning applications these days must fit the policy. The neighbours may hate it but if it complies with the policies laid down by the council then it will be approved.

                        So if you had a lane down alongside the neighbours house where the garage is now, providing vehicle access, and you design a residential scheme that does not overlook the neighbours, and you can provide enough parking space for the number of bedrooms, and you do good design - eco stuff, sustainability, bike parking, etc, and you provide outside amenity space (gardens, balcony, etc), and your scheme looks good, and the council needs to increase housing stock in the area where you live of the type you are planning, then yes, go for it!

                        Charlie

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