Stock Fencing

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    Stock Fencing

    Folks,

    I refer to the above. I've been advised I need to partition off a piece of land with Stock Fencing. Any idea on cost (materials/labour) and best place to source.

    Cheers.

    Blighty

    #2
    depends on the stock - sheep? horses? llamas?
    Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

    Comment


      #3
      Sheep and cattle.

      Cheers.

      Blighty

      Comment


        #4
        you need "universal netting" and above 2 strands of high tensile barbed wire the lower strand should be no more than 1 inch above the universal netting which needs to be ring clipped to it. For post stakes you need 3 to 4 inch minimum diameter tanalized natural posts (not worked on a lathe)5ft 6 overall in length. All corner posts and strainers/change of direction want to be 6 to 8 ins diameter - these should be at least every 50 metres. Do not hang gates off strainer posts but fit a separate gate post. Galvaized fittings only - dont drive staples home against wire but leave gap so fence can be restrained. Get an agricultural fencing contractor to do it - use a post driver - no need to concrete if done properly!
        Phew! Thanks husband (typical farmer)! Hope that helps Blighty
        Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

        Comment


          #5
          Depending on how much fencing, you might do it yourself or pay a bod.

          Islandgirl has a good spec, there.

          I've done 100-200m in the last year or so to mark boundaries, which I did myself to learn how. A few things I've learnt which may or may not be useful.

          When you attach wire to posts using staples (be generous with the staple size) the idea is *not* to hammer it in solidly, but to leave the wire loose enough so that it can move with heat and if you need to adjust it later. I also use 4-5" posts at corners with angled brace posts (a cut down 3-4") at corners rather than 6", as these are easier to handle. My approach needs postcrete for these.

          When you first attach the wire make sure that the strainer bolts are adjusted to their loosest position so there's room to tighten them as much as you need :-).

          My other quirk is that when joining posts or rails (not needed for wire) I use 3" decking screws driven straight in with a decent drill-driver, which is quick and cheap, and a single Wickes green outdoor wood bolt from the other side - again driven straight in though if you take it our again it gets hot.

          I also level the wire then cut the tops off at 30 degrees to help water runoff, and paint with left over gloss from the house if it needs to be seen (cut and paint, or leave it).

          As suggested, use an agricultural fencing contractor or any local farmer. Use an *agricultural* supplier (they will work ex-VAT so be aware). As a guide prices I pay are roughly.

          4" 5'6" tanalised post about £1.80.
          5m half round rail - about £5. (for stock fencing you won't want these)
          IIRC galvanised wire is 20-30p per m.
          Strainer bolts about 50p.
          5 bar agricultural gate with 2 metal 2.5m posts - about £70.

          If you select, choose the heaviest posts with the most tanalising liquid in them. But if you are into 6" posts these are *heavy* - I can't pick one up on my own.

          If you do it yourself, yes - a post rammer (about £50). Or better - a JCB with a hydraulic post rammer. Choose the right people to do it and they will have one.

          As an example of work rate, here 2 blokes and a small JCB did a manege with triple rail fencing (4"-6" posts and 3 half round rails) in well under a day.

          ML
          Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

          Comment


            #6
            Sell your sheep and cattle. Put the field up for rent (licence) for horse grazing that way you will get a better financial return than farming. And the licensee will have to put their own fencing up.

            Comment


              #7
              Dear All,

              Thanks all for the comments/advice. I'm planning building on my small 2/3rd acre plot.

              I can now see what I need buy but still not sure how much to budget for materials/labour for a 2/3rd acre fencing job?

              Cheers.

              Blighty

              Comment


                #8
                Building? Now that is altogether another issue...
                Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by blighty View Post
                  Dear All,

                  Thanks all for the comments/advice. I'm planning building on my small 2/3rd acre plot.

                  I can now see what I need buy but still not sure how much to budget for materials/labour for a 2/3rd acre fencing job?

                  Cheers.

                  Blighty
                  Only you can find that out by designing your fence, adding up your supplies, and researching suppliers.

                  Expect a variance of 300%, depending how far up the supply chain you can get so that you hang on to the money which would go in the profits and costs of all the rest.

                  I've given enough detail to estimate for my type of fence. Add that up, double it or halve it depending on your fence design, and make that a target.

                  Apart from anything else, a site area tells us nothing whatsover about the amount of fence.

                  You haven't said whether your 3000sqm plot is circular at one extreme (fence length = 200m), or very long and thin (fence length = 6002m if it is 3 km long by 1m wide), or somewhere in between :-).

                  Over to you and your calculator.

                  For me, a rustic "post and one rail plus a properly tensionable single wire fence with postcrete every third post" is about £3 a metre if I build it myself (1 x 4-5" post, 2 x 3-4" posts, one 5m rail, 5m of wire, one bag of postcrete, and a few screws, and odds and sods, for each 5m section).

                  A good quality 2m garden fence with concrete posts postcreted in, 1 ft gravelboard, and 5ft high panels a damn sight better than a DIY shed supplies is around £20-21 a metre if I build it myself, though I wouldn't do it as 9ft concrete posts need a navvy or Mick McManus to handle them.

                  For installation of the latter my usual supplier, who manufacture everything themselves, charge £30 per hole.

                  The last time I did one of these I cut a deal where I supplied and pre-sprayed the materials and T used her connections to get it built, and we both got the better half of the deal - except for the people T persuaded to build it for her who had a tough day :-).

                  On that basis if your plot is 40m x 75m then you need 230m of fence minus the gates which cost more so that is between £800 and £5000 on my 2 estimates plus between 3 days and 3 weeks of time and a hot bath every day if you build it yourself.

                  If you are having a real garden fence built by someone else professionally you will be on up to £50-£70 a metre and the answer is "most of the money you were going to spend on that loft conversion" or perhaps £12-16,000.

                  You need answers on the ground for particular suppliers and your particular fence on your particular site to get any further.

                  ML
                  Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

                  Comment

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