Removing a partition wall within a listed building

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    Removing a partition wall within a listed building

    hi

    Some 20 years ago a plasterboard wall was removed from a room in a grade two listed building.
    according to the term of a listed building, all is listed that were their as of the 1st July 1948. needless to say plasterboard was not around in 1948.
    My question is, do i need retrospective listed building consent for the removal of a wall some 20 years ago?

    thanks in advance

    #2
    Originally posted by burns View Post
    hi

    Some 20 years ago a plasterboard wall was removed from a room in a grade two listed building.
    according to the term of a listed building, all is listed that were their as of the 1st July 1948. needless to say plasterboard was not around in 1948.
    My question is, do i need retrospective listed building consent for the removal of a wall some 20 years ago?

    thanks in advance
    Why on earth would you want all the bother and expense of filing a listed building consent for such an anodyne matter?
    I think the answer might depend on whether the plasterboard removed was performing some purpose such as fire prevention. Sometimes what is right from a listing building perspective is at conflict with building regulations. There is a little more flexibility with listed buildings.

    Comment


      #3
      It sounds as if you may be selling it and are worried about solicitors nitpicking, and perhaps by how detailed you need to be on the PiF, or there's some other reason why this is being brought up now.

      Technically you probably do need to have consent to be absolutely 100% safe (my lay view), because that's perhaps the only way listing can be practically implemented, and we are in an age of box-ticking and pre-emptive arse-covering by officialdom. I don't believe that a time limit applies to changes to a listed building, and it more revolves around matching to information which is available.

      The criteria is:

      "The controls apply to any works for the demolition of a listed building, or for its alteration or extension, which is likely to affect its character as a building of special architectural or historical interest. "

      In your position and from what you've said, I wouldn't worry about it, and - depending on the circumstances and whether it could be disproved, I'd just keep quiet about it. The fewer fictional nits mentioned, the fewer fictional nits there are to pick.

      If you are concerned then a phone call to EH or to your local BCO might be in order, either anonymously as a general enquiry, or specifically with emailed photos on request.

      If you're selling it, consider getting a survey done, and asking advice from the Surveyor while he's perambulating.

      ML
      Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

      Comment


        #4
        For info:

        "The development of plasterboard (a sandwich of gypsum plaster between two sheets of paper) dates back to the late nineteenth century in the USA. The first plasterboard patent was granted in 1894 but it was not until an American, Frank Culver, persuaded his new employer, Thomas McGhie and Sons, to buy a plasterboard plant from the USA that this new product was introduced to Britain. A site was acquired at Wallasey Cheshire and building started in 1916. However, McGhie’s shareholders could not supply sufficient funding and in 1917 the plasterboard assets were sold to a new company, British Plaster Board Limited [BPB]."

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BPB_plc

        ML
        Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

        Comment

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