Rear extension on purpose built block.

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    Rear extension on purpose built block.

    I know that there are no permitted development rights for blocks of flats, so would appreciate some advice.

    We live in the ground floor flat of a 2 storey block of 4 purpose built flats in London, and have a relatively large garden space to the rear. The building is somewhat unusual for a central London location in that it is completely detached from any other houses, it is at the end of a cul-de-sac so it surrounded by the gardens of houses in 3 other streets. The nearest buildings are the back of other people's houses, the closest being around 15m away on our side, and around 10m away on the other ground floor flat's side. To the rear the closest buildings are about 30m away. So it is an unusual site for London as it stands alone and is not really very close to anyone else's residence at all.

    What do you think the chances are that we would get planning permission to extend to the rear? As an added complication we are in a Conservation Zone, but the rear of the property is not visible from the street at all except for at one very particular and small point on one of the surrounding streets, most people who live here don't even know that the block exists at all as it is so tucked away.

    To my mind the situation is somewhat unusual so I'm hoping we might get permission to do something relatively radical, like a 4m rear extension right across the width of the property (both ground floor properties.

    Does anyone have any opinions as to whether this is worth pursuing or not?

    #2
    Don't forget you will need Landlord's permission first. No point in spending money on planning until you have achieved this.

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      #3
      I have the landlord's permission to do whatever I want, so that isn't relevant to this particular enquiry. I own a share of the freehold and everyone else is happy to let me do this.

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        #4
        Get some plans drawn up and stick them in is the only way to find out. There are too many variables for anyone unfamiliar with the site to give an opinion.
        But if you come up with something sympathetic to the neighbourhood and the neighbours don't object then it could easily be waved through by a council officer under delegated powers.
        Good luck.
        Ps. You may have more joy these days sticking two storeys on top *

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          #5
          Originally posted by Andrea Cunningham View Post
          I have the landlord's permission to do whatever I want, so that isn't relevant to this particular enquiry. I own a share of the freehold and everyone else is happy to let me do this.
          Thank you for telling us.

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            #6
            What do you think the chances are that we would get planning permission to extend to the rear?
            Since these flats are detached as a block, then there is not really much difference from the PD rights that are granted for a detached house, which should make your chances quite good if two adjacent properties are being extended at the same time.

            What may need some attention is the shape of the roof of the extended part of the ground floor buildings, because the external wall of the upper storey flats may be demised to those flats, so that a roof cannot be attached to the wall above a certain height.

            I'm sure a good architect can design a suitable extension once the facts regarding the external walls of the upstairs flats is given careful consideration.

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              #7
              Originally posted by pilman View Post
              What may need some attention is the shape of the roof of the extended part of the ground floor buildings, because the external wall of the upper storey flats may be demised to those flats, so that a roof cannot be attached to the wall above a certain height.

              The lease demises "the inner half severed medially" of internal walls, but makes no mention of external. It does specifically demise "All doors and windows and door and window frames", but makes no mention of the walls themselves

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                #8
                You mentioned that the freeholder is giving permission but it may be sensible to discuss with the two owners of the first floor flats how the roof of the proposed extension will be constructed.

                That applies if there are windows facing the rear in either of the first floor flats, which means that a pitched roof can only have a very low height if it has to avoid obscuring a window.

                There may also be the need for lead flashing if a sloping or pitched roof was to be used next to an existing vertical wall owned by the freeholder. Best to resolve what can be done with the freeholder's and the other leaseholder's permission.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by pilman View Post
                  You mentioned that the freeholder is giving permission but it may be sensible to discuss with the two owners of the first floor flats how the roof of the proposed extension will be constructed.
                  Thanks for your input, all very useful

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