Side return extension on Victorian end terrace

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Side return extension on Victorian end terrace

    Hypothetical at this stage, but I'd value your thoughts. Considering buying a Victorian end-terrace house in a northern town, with a side driveway about 4 m wide. Not in a conservation area but opposite one (across the river). Ground floor is amazing, but the layout of first and second floors is ridiculous, a lot of wasted space on both floors due to the 2 staircases being huge and going right up through centre of the house (rather than up the side walls as is more usual). Stairs cannot be relocated within the house.

    What are the chances of being allowed to build a side extension in matching brick onto the gable end (about 3m back from the front elevation), about 1.5 m deep, 4 m long, and almost as high as the existing house roof, housing two new staircases? These would open into the first and second floors respectively and allow the accommodation on all 3 floors to be improved hugely, in particular in terms of sizes and shapes of rooms. Windows in extension could be on long outside wall (parallel to gable end of house) or on back elevation.

    Extension would be at least 1 m from neighbouring house's gable end.

    Would planning permission be required, or is it permitted development?

    Thanks in advance.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

    #2
    Nice to see you posting!

    Chapter and verse can be found here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...chedule/2/made The part you need comes at the beginning. Unfortunately it is all a bit involved. Simply looking at the requirements may not be enough as you need to know the history - see for example A1(b). Apart from that, you need to know (a) if the property comes in a "designated area" as to which see here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...chedule/1/made (b) if the area is subject to an article 4 direction as to which see here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...article/4/made (c) if the property is subject to a planning condition which prohibits the proposed development. Given the complications and the fact that different planning authorities have different policies, if contemplating development a preliminary discussion with the planning authority or engaging a planning consultant has to be advised.

    You will also need to consider if section 6 of the Party Wall etc. Act 1996 applies: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1996/40/section/6

    Comment


      #3
      Hello, Lawcruncher! As I feared, these things are never straightforward, but thank you for your detailed and helpful analysis. Much appreciated.
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

      Comment


        #4
        I am worried by the statement 'across the river'! Given the recent flooding are you certain it is not at risk of flooding?

        Comment


          #5
          There are clearly no absolute guarantees these days where flooding is concerned, but house insurance for this propertyis readily available (always a good sign), the property is deemed low risk and the engineer in charge of the council's flood defence installation lives in the same street. 🙂

          At least it's not built on a flood plain!
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

          Comment

          Latest Activity

          Collapse

          Working...
          X