First timer buyer, laminate flooring ground floor flat

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    First timer buyer, laminate flooring ground floor flat

    Hey guys, signed up to this forum specifically for help with this question,

    Basically I'm moving into my first flat on Friday, I bought it so i'm not renting etc. It's leasehold/share of freehold.
    in my lease it says I should have carpet, but to me carpet seems very dated and it doesn't suit how I plan on decorating my first home, also I suffer with allergies so It'd be hygienic and comfortable for me to have laminate or wooden flooring.

    My argument is that even though it says I should have carpet, I visited other flats from the same building and surrounding buildings and they all had wooden flooring, and my flat is a GROUND flat, I have people above me and people attached to my kitchen but apart from that the bedroom, living room, bathroom, and hallway are all detached from other residents, so I don't see why it'd be a problem for me to have wooden or laminate flooring.

    How strictly is the lease to be followed? are ground floor flats exceptions? what will be the consequences of me having wooden/laminate flooring even though I own my property? should I just put the floor I want down and see what happens? (I don't think anyone will complain, because the flat is detached apart from people above me).

    Hope this is clear, new to this forum so bare with me!

    Thanks, all replies appreciated.

    #2
    Originally posted by charlesf View Post
    ...bare with me!
    Pedantic, I know, but that is an invitation to collective nudity. 'Bear with me' seems more appropriate in this context.
    There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

    Comment


      #3
      The requirement for carpet does two things

      1 insulted foot fall etc from those below. That doesn’t apply to you however 2 does.

      2 carpeting also deflects and absorb airborne noise which otherwise “bounces” into adjacent homes.

      Imagine the empty room with no carpet and curtains and you realise the difference that those make in terms of “echo” and “ emptiness”.

      Very soften this is not policed, however if a neighbour complains and there are those that do, you risk being in breach and therefore required to carpet over.

      As to allergies that is absolute rubbish. Hard floors, on a daily basis, allow dust and allergens to freely accumulate and circulate (one breeze from a closed door and they are airborne), while a carpet will collect them, and if regularly vacuumed with a decent vacuum, will be far healthier. I know, as a child, my parents put in a hard floor in my room on doctors advice and it was a miserable 6 months. As soon as carpet tiles went down, I improved.
      Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

      Comment


        #4
        Don't you just hate foot fall who are insulted?

        I agree it has to be carpet or you risk having to replace all your flooring at some point in the future. If you do decide against this advice please don't put laminate down because it is naff.

        Comment


          #5
          Speak to the other leaseholders / directors of the freehold company and find out first. As you are a ground floor flat, I cant see there being any complaints.

          Comment


            #6
            But bbva as explained the noise is not simply going down, but reflects to properties around and above. When presented with these issues I use a noise meter and people are stunned about how much difference a carpeted room and boarded room can make.
            Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by QuestForFreedom View Post
              Don't you just hate foot fall who are insulted?

              .
              I know, its just rude.

              In one case,in a respectable part of a nice "County town" a resident complained of the lady above and her "clomping around in high heels,and why on earth she can't wear slippers".
              Licence had been given for wood floors with a high performance underlay,so this was surprising.

              After some investigation, it turned out her clientelle prefered high heels,especially patent leather ones, the higher the better ! Itpays to make sure that you close the wardrobe door where you keepyour impressive collection and tools of the trade.
              Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by leaseholdanswers View Post
                the noise is not simply going down, but reflects to properties around and above.
                The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Although carpets may now be passé they are not yet obsolete. Give it a few more years and it will be: "Darling! Don't tell me you're still walking on wood. That's just so yesterday!" Changing fashion is no excuse for failing to observe a lease term.

                  When it comes to enforcement though the fact that a number of flats have already breached the covenant will be in your favour. However, you cannot rely on that absolutely.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by charlesf View Post
                    The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.
                    I reckon the high ceilings will possibly amplify the noise, they do in my flat

                    Maybe you should visit the upstairs flat and see if they have wooden floors, because if they see how lovely your wooden flooring looks they might well choose wooden floors in the future

                    You will then see why they are discouraged in flats.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Indeed that other flats have wood floors might lead to revolution when the landlord becomnes aware and starts to enforce the terms of the lease.
                      Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by charlesf View Post
                        The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.
                        The response to that is that logic often fails to answer a question when given incomplete information and inappropriate assumptions. As explained more space allows amplification and dense walls can conduct sound especially certain frequencies.

                        I recall a case where the resident complained of sickening headaches and called in the EHO. They established that despite her being 6 floors and the entire length of the building away, harmonics from the new fan in the central boiler flue were quite high, though inaudible to you or I.

                        If you take the risk understand that it is a risk and no amount of argument over logic and common sense will prevent the lease from being enforced.
                        Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
                          Although carpets may now be passé they are not yet obsolete. Give it a few more years and it will be: "Darling! Don't tell me you're still walking on wood. That's just so yesterday!" Changing fashion is no excuse for failing to observe a lease term..
                          Remember the time when parquet floors were "to die for?"
                          Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by DNM2012 View Post
                            I reckon the high ceilings will possibly amplify the noise, they do in my flat

                            Maybe you should visit the upstairs flat and see if they have wooden floors, because if they see how lovely your wooden flooring looks they might well choose wooden floors in the future

                            You will then see why they are discouraged in flats.
                            I completely understand why they're discouraged in flats, If i lived above ground floor I'd have carpet without question, but considering my flat is detached, ground, and double the height of a normal flat, I thought I'd ask.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Ultimately in your situation it is the flat above that 'could' complain.

                              If they notice an increase of noise (particularly at night) from below after you put the wooden floor in they may well do.

                              It really does increase noise levels and not just footsteps.

                              Drop a bunch of keys at night on carpet, the noise is negligible, drop them onto a wooden floor and its likely to wake people up.

                              Comment

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