First timer buyer, laminate flooring ground floor flat

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  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    From another palce, the problem with wooden floors...

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/....php?t=4832424
    I am a leaseholder in a house where the leaseholders all have a share in, and are directors of, the freehold company. I have had a lot of problems over noise from the upstairs neighbour who installed wooden floors despite my telling him (I am secretary of the company) this contravened the lease, which demands close carpeting in all areas except bathroom and WC). A lot of noise comes through. He just ignored what I said and theatened to make as much noise as ne could if I complained about noise again. (I had had no such problems with the previous owners who did have carpet down).

    He now wants to sell his flat and the freehold company has told him that he needs to install carpet before selling, to comply with the lease. Only then did he tetll us that he has installed underfloor heating which he thought needed a wooden floor to work properly. This made him reluctant to agree to lay carpet, he said, but now he has found out that underfloor heating CAN work with carpet and has agreed to lay down carpet before selling.

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  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    And ye verily why I dubbed them the " devil's floorboards"....

    I will one day succeed in getting that quoted in a tribunal decision!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawcruncher
    replied
    Indeed.

    Not only carpets but soft furnishings and upholstery absorb sound. You notice the difference if you clear a room to decorate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    Such noise having being amplified by the wooden floors......

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  • bbva
    replied
    You may find some wonderful old wooden floors under those carpets. If so, I would sand and refinish. Frankly TV noise is more likely to disturb the flat upstairs.

    Leave a comment:


  • DNM2012
    replied
    Ultimately in your situation it is the flat above that 'could' complain.

    If they notice an increase of noise (particularly at night) from below after you put the wooden floor in they may well do.

    It really does increase noise levels and not just footsteps.

    Drop a bunch of keys at night on carpet, the noise is negligible, drop them onto a wooden floor and its likely to wake people up.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlesf
    replied
    Originally posted by DNM2012 View Post
    I reckon the high ceilings will possibly amplify the noise, they do in my flat

    Maybe you should visit the upstairs flat and see if they have wooden floors, because if they see how lovely your wooden flooring looks they might well choose wooden floors in the future

    You will then see why they are discouraged in flats.
    I completely understand why they're discouraged in flats, If i lived above ground floor I'd have carpet without question, but considering my flat is detached, ground, and double the height of a normal flat, I thought I'd ask.

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  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    Originally posted by Lawcruncher View Post
    Although carpets may now be passé they are not yet obsolete. Give it a few more years and it will be: "Darling! Don't tell me you're still walking on wood. That's just so yesterday!" Changing fashion is no excuse for failing to observe a lease term..
    Remember the time when parquet floors were "to die for?"

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    Originally posted by charlesf View Post
    The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.
    The response to that is that logic often fails to answer a question when given incomplete information and inappropriate assumptions. As explained more space allows amplification and dense walls can conduct sound especially certain frequencies.

    I recall a case where the resident complained of sickening headaches and called in the EHO. They established that despite her being 6 floors and the entire length of the building away, harmonics from the new fan in the central boiler flue were quite high, though inaudible to you or I.

    If you take the risk understand that it is a risk and no amount of argument over logic and common sense will prevent the lease from being enforced.

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  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    Indeed that other flats have wood floors might lead to revolution when the landlord becomnes aware and starts to enforce the terms of the lease.

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  • DNM2012
    replied
    Originally posted by charlesf View Post
    The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.
    I reckon the high ceilings will possibly amplify the noise, they do in my flat

    Maybe you should visit the upstairs flat and see if they have wooden floors, because if they see how lovely your wooden flooring looks they might well choose wooden floors in the future

    You will then see why they are discouraged in flats.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawcruncher
    replied
    Although carpets may now be passé they are not yet obsolete. Give it a few more years and it will be: "Darling! Don't tell me you're still walking on wood. That's just so yesterday!" Changing fashion is no excuse for failing to observe a lease term.

    When it comes to enforcement though the fact that a number of flats have already breached the covenant will be in your favour. However, you cannot rely on that absolutely.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlesf
    replied
    Originally posted by leaseholdanswers View Post
    the noise is not simply going down, but reflects to properties around and above.
    The ceilings in my flat are double as high as a 'normal' flat, and it's an old hospital, built for holding heavy equipment and a lot of people, so the noise has double as long to travel, more time to break down, before it meets the people above me, and I don't have anyone either side of me. with proper insulation I can't see anyone complaining about the noise.

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    Originally posted by QuestForFreedom View Post
    Don't you just hate foot fall who are insulted?

    .
    I know, its just rude.

    In one case,in a respectable part of a nice "County town" a resident complained of the lady above and her "clomping around in high heels,and why on earth she can't wear slippers".
    Licence had been given for wood floors with a high performance underlay,so this was surprising.

    After some investigation, it turned out her clientelle prefered high heels,especially patent leather ones, the higher the better ! Itpays to make sure that you close the wardrobe door where you keepyour impressive collection and tools of the trade.

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholdanswers
    replied
    But bbva as explained the noise is not simply going down, but reflects to properties around and above. When presented with these issues I use a noise meter and people are stunned about how much difference a carpeted room and boarded room can make.

    Leave a comment:

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