Fire health and safety reports

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    Fire health and safety reports

    I understand that the landlord is responsible for carrying out a risk assessment of the building/ communal areas either by a competent director or by appointing a professional company. How often do these risk assessments and reports need to be done and do they need to meet the building insurance terms and conditions?

    #2
    Here is a report by Leasehold Advisory Service on health and safety inspection :

    https://www.lease-advice.org/article...-and-who-pays/

    The first inspection should reveal any major concerns such as "combustible cladding applied to external walls" , cluttered up hallways , emergency lighting at landings and labels for fire doors ( keep closed ) etc.

    Comment


      #3
      Gordon999 thanks for sharing the link I am still not sure if these reports need to be done every five years or so?

      Comment


        #4
        Frequency of inspections will depend upon the review and assessment of the responsible person usually the freeholder or their agent. In our building we typically have risk assessments based on the recommendation of the risk assessor when they carry out inspections. In our case fire risk assessments were carried out roughly every 3 years. If there is a material change to the property a new assessment may need to be carried out irrespective of when the last assessment was undertaken.

        You should always ensure that any terms and conditions of the insurance policy are adhered to.

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          #5
          In our building our new management company organised a fire safety certificate. Apparently everything was fine. A couple of months later the fire brigade issued an enforcement notice against our building, as it was deemed unsafe. No cladding, no change in the building. Just badly inspected. For example they missed one of our fire escapes being nailed shut for years. So probably not a bad idea to do a walk around in your building yourself even if your certificate comes back as perfect. At least check that your fire escapes are not nailed shut...

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            #6
            London2021

            In your case, it looks like the appointed responsible person was unsuitable to take on the role.

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              #7
              Starlane

              I do not think that there is any firm answer to your question, a fire risk assessment used to be required at least every 5 years unless there had been any changes made at the building. Grenfell has changed that and 3 years seems to be the norm now. The rogue freeholders used to carry out the exercise annually and simply copy the report from year to year but they seem to have realised that they are unqualified to assess the risks and so they use specialists now.

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                #8
                I think that in our case all the persons involved in our building are unsuitable for their roles. This whole leasehold system, with terrible management companies and potential for rogue/unprofessional RTM directors do not work. Needs revamping big time!

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                  #9
                  London2021 unfortunately I agree with you, its incredible how people cant be reasonable and understand that we should be all working together, I plan on moving now as the stress and frustration of it all is too much, a home should be a safe and happy place not a war zone!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Starlane, that is very true. Instead of understanding that we should all be working together, like you say, it becomes a power struggle for some silly directors. In my building, the directors simply ignore emails from residents of directly lie. And when called out by the residents for the misinformation, they ignore, ignore, ignore. It is pretty shocking behaviour. All the while they use the general reserve fund of the building to finance improvements to their own leasehold units.

                    I am now desperately looking for a freehold property to move to. Because as you say, a home should be a safe and happy place, not a war zone.

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