Sat Dish

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  • Trevor62
    replied
    I and the other freeholder cleared the Ivy last year, but it is starting to grow back it has not yet reached the brick work, now the renters are living there.
    I was considering to poison it, ive read about this solution called Roseate 360, it is supposed to work, I did use some brand I bought in wilko's awhile ago but all it did was make the leave's turn white. I have a lot growing around my hedge and am always pulling out new shoots but if I leave it it will grow rapidly.

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  • ram
    replied
    Originally posted by flyingfreehold View Post
    brickwork has pointing not grouting ram. Actually your advice is wrong. Removing live ivy Will do damage to delicate brickwork.
    I used the language Trevor62.used.
    Of course, let the Ivy die for a few months before removal. Thanks for your comments.


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  • flyingfreehold
    replied
    brickwork has pointing not grouting ram. Actually your advice is wrong. Removing live ivy Will do damage to delicate brickwork. Better to cut through the stems low down so that the plant on the brickwork dessicates and remove it once it is brown and dead, it will no longer possess the same clinging ability, Then treat the roots with a herbicide.

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  • ram
    replied
    Originally posted by Trevor62 View Post
    the Ivy has started to grow again and I have been wanting to kill it off but I am not sure of my rights regarding this. As I am also the freeholder do I have the right to remove this plant without permission, what should I do?
    2 leaseholders who are also joint freeholders.
    As the ivy is potentionaly destroying the brick work and grouting, and suck all moistue out of bricks. then that is a maintenece issue and should be removed a.s.a.p. and the cost of same divided by 2 of you.

    If the downstairs flat leaseholder does not want to pay his half then just remove the Ivy, pull up the roots ( which travel a long way under the soil, )
    Job done. - you will be acting as a concerned freeholder, and doing a job that any freeholder should do or have done
    He wont make you plant new Ivy, by the way.



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  • Trevor62
    replied
    Originally posted by ram View Post


    1) You say "We are both leaseholders & and shared freeholders" therefore you have 50% in favour, and 50% declining the application. Therefore, at present, a disk cannot be errected.

    2) you should not be communication with a "renter", but the owner of the flat.

    But if circumstances dictate that the renter has asked you, and his landlord can't be bothered to discuas this with you, then write ( not email ) go the renter, and advise that no way will you allow a dish to be installed, nor for him or any agents of his to damage, via drilling holes in the freeholders walls to fit such a dish.
    Stating that you as a freeholder of the building, do not give permission to attach anything to your building.

    Don;t go into how many freeholders there are, just say above.
    .

    Im trying my best not to get on the wrong side of the renters, to be honest Im not to happy having them as downstairs neighbours, they are noisy, in everyway.

    There is another issue that maybe the forum could advise me on: When the freeholder was living downstairs there was an issue with Ivy growing up the front of the building. It had started to reach my window and I had too trim it, I convince the freeholder to get rid of it. We both had also noticed that the Ivy had loosened some of the grouting when removed.

    Anyway the Ivy has started to grow again and I have been wanting to kill it off but I am not sure of my rights regarding this. As I am also the freeholder do I have the right to remove this plant without permission, what should I do?

    Many Thanks



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  • vmart
    replied
    andydd's point is the point I was alluding too. Satellite dishes are no longer necessary. In this case, the original poster should write to the landlord/co-freeholder refusing the erection of the dish and separately write to the tenant re same (ccd to landlord). There are also planning rules in relation to satellite dishes on blocks.

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  • andydd
    replied
    Arnt Sky slowly moving away from dishes to IP services ?. IMO its a waste of money at tis (late) stage to start installing dishes, everything can be got via internet at less cost, a simple NOW stick for example.

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  • eagle2
    replied
    If wifi is available, you can suggest that the other leaseholder uses it instead of fitting a dish. Or you could grant conditional consent subject to any damage being made good by the leaseholder.

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  • ram
    replied
    Originally posted by Trevor62 View Post
    The lease is not clear on this issue and I am dealing with renter's as the leaseholder/shared freeholder does not live there.
    1) You say "We are both leaseholders & and shared freeholders" therefore you have 50% in favour, and 50% declining the application. Therefore, at present, a disk cannot be errected.

    2) you should not be communication with a "renter", but the owner of the flat.

    But if circumstances dictate that the renter has asked you, and his landlord can't be bothered to discuas this with you, then write ( not email ) go the renter, and advise that no way will you allow a dish to be installed, nor for him or any agents of his to damage, via drilling holes in the freeholders walls to fit such a dish.
    Stating that you as a freeholder of the building, do not give permission to attach anything to your building.

    Don;t go into how many freeholders there are, just say above.
    .


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  • Trevor62
    replied
    There is already an antenna on the roof, which they are using. The lease is not clear on this issue and I am dealing with renter's as the leaseholder/shared freeholder does not live there.

    There are a couple of reasons that I am against this as firstly the bricks are old and prone to crumbling when something is bolted on to the wall, plus I find these dishes to be completely unatractive especially when they become old looking.

    I shall see what transpires.

    Many Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • vmart
    replied
    It would be unreasonable not to allow your neighbour to have access to services. However, as there are alternatives now to satellite dishes, it is arguably not unreasonable for you to refuse.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    Check leases but almost certainly the would need agreement of freeholder (a separate corporate body, not you, not downstairs).

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  • ram
    replied
    Yes, your permission to install anything on the building is required. Notify the other leaseholder that you do not give permission to install a Sat' Dish
    However, others may give you more info as to how to overcome the problems you may face if the other flat goes ahead without your permission.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trevor62
    started a topic Sat Dish

    Sat Dish

    This is a general question.

    I live in a maisonette, one flat upstairs one flat downtstairs. I am the upper flat, the downstairs flat want to bolt a satelite dish to the wall, I dont want a dish on the building wall.

    We are both leaseholders & and shared freeholders, do they need my permission?

    Many Thanks

Latest Activity

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  • Old managing agents accounts
    by jazzythumper
    Since obtaining the RTM and changing the managing agent, we have never been given full accounts / receipts for the previous year(s). We believe that as the old freeholder and leaser holder of one of the flats were represented by the same solicitor that prior to the sale of the freehold, we were subsidising...
    20-05-2022, 11:21 AM
  • Reply to Old managing agents accounts
    by jazzythumper
    Since we have no reconciliation accounts, and the old managing agent didn’t pass on any account or funds to us, we have no way of knowing whether the debt was wiped with the sale of the freehold which I suspect it was. Sadly I don’t think it seems there is any way tl
    find this info out?...
    27-05-2022, 11:14 AM
  • Freehold confusion
    by davetg
    30 years ago I bought a flat from a friend. The freehold at the time was registered to my friend and the lady who owned the other flat. I understood at the time that I would replace the friend on the freehold but this never happened. This was not a problem until now as when work on the structure of...
    24-05-2022, 14:29 PM
  • Reply to Freehold confusion
    by AndrewDod
    I'd partially disagree with ^.
    Certainly it will have no value on the open market sold alone. But would have value as an addition to a flat sale, simply because the control that can be exerted carries value (the same does not apply to a typical; share of freehold situation where a minority owner...
    27-05-2022, 09:29 AM
  • Reply to 2-1 transfer - what does Freeholder do?
    by Lawcruncher
    There are two distinct things.

    One is whether the landlord's consent is required for the transfer. If it is (which would be unusual but not unknown for a long residential lease) then the landlord can impose reasonable conditions on granting the consent. If it is not, then the landlord has...
    27-05-2022, 08:04 AM
  • 2-1 transfer - what does Freeholder do?
    by Flashback1966
    I am a Freeholder. Have a flat there too. I have received an email from the leaseholder's soclitors acting for Mr A. They are doing a 2-1 transfer from the names of Mr A and Ms B to just Mr.

    The solicitors want to know the requirements on completion.

    Is is just a notice of...
    26-05-2022, 18:46 PM
  • Reply to Freehold confusion
    by CStevens
    In response to your questions:

    1. You will need the landlord to sign a TR1 as suggested above. If your friend has passed away then his Executors will have to sign;
    2. In short no. The real value in these freeholds is normally the money that has to be paid in order to extend leases....
    27-05-2022, 06:42 AM
  • Reply to 2-1 transfer - what does Freeholder do?
    by CStevens
    check the tenant's lease but normally you should (a) ensure all rent and service charges are paid up to date; (b) check that there are no existing breaches of the lease. If there are then you should require the tenant to deal with these before agreeing to acknowledge the transfer.

    With...
    27-05-2022, 06:34 AM
  • Share of feehold/shared service charges?
    by Stu1020
    Hi there,

    I'm new to the forum and looking for advice on a sticky freehold situation.

    I own a two-bed flat in a converted building with two one-beds. The lease states that a fair proportion is payable towards the service charge. However, there has been a running agreement of...
    20-05-2022, 11:39 AM
  • Reply to Share of feehold/shared service charges?
    by CStevens
    You dont have to proceed on the existing agreement nor do you have to proceed on the share paid for the freehold. If the lease's state that it has to be a fair and reasonable amount then that's what it should be - whether you calculate that based on use, sq ft of the flats is really down to debate unless...
    27-05-2022, 06:30 AM
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