Storage in Common Parts

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    Storage in Common Parts

    Our new build has two flats on each floor. To the side of our front doors their is a large bright area, well away from the stairwell. All tenants have been using this to leave buggies, shoe racks and small storage chests. We had planned to jointly buy some potted plants and even pictures to make the area less bare and less like a student hall of residence. Our landlord has a zero tolerance policy and is asking us all to remove everything from these huge areas. To repeat the areas are well away from the stairwell. Is it worth appealing to the landlord’s (large corporate) common sense or is it an insurance issue that’s not worth fighting.

    #2
    *We are leaseholders who chose to pass on buying the freehold.

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      #3
      To be brutally honest i think the Freeholder is right, those pictures look a mess ..... already. The trouble with allowing people to use the area as a place of storage is you all relinquish control of what goes there, it becomes a free for all, it may start with potted plants and pictures but ends up with Keter (or similar) storage boxes and other such items, if i lived there i would want to keep it clean and empty.

      The passing of buying the Freehold was a mistake but in this case even if you all were shareholders in the Freehold company i would still keep it empty and at most would put a few nice pictures up ..... but that would be it.

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        #4
        In the event of a fire these items will cause a hazard to the fire fighters entering, who will be finding their way around under black smoke conditions.

        The landlord is absolutely correct to have a zero tollerance policy. They are showing their dilligence.

        Having items here would mean the building fails any insurance or fire service inspection. If you have ever had to show an inspector round a building such as this it would be obvious. In some blocks you will also be asked to remove doormats, a trip hazard to fire fighters.

        Please educate yourself on the matter. I am sorry if this reply seems blunt but it's the usual non understanding from residents.

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          #5
          AS above.
          The common areas, are for the PASSAGE of leaseholders. and not an extension of their "demise".

          The lease gives the leaseholders the right to use their flats as living quarters and storage, for which you all paid a price to be able to use your demised space.

          This was in the form a lease. You bought the lease that allows you to use and reside in your flat.

          The leaseholders have not bought the right to use for their personal storage, the common areas. They do not have a lease that grants them the right to store personal belongings in areas that are not leased to them.
          You are in fact trespassing if you leave stuff there. but not trespassing if you use the space to walk across to get to your flat.

          Same as a common back garden. You can walk across it, sit on it, but you cant be putting up sheds in the garden E.G. 4 sheds for 4 leaseholders, as you have not paid to lease the garden, nor have you paid to lease the corridors.

          Yes, the freeholder is right.
          Not only that, if you want it to start looking like a slum, with a free for all, with bicycles, motor cycles, old car wheels etc adorning the passage ways, then go ahead and complain that you the freeholder is preventing you from doing that.
          And you are happy to repair the walls that have knocked off the paint, scored the walls, that was not caused by your stuff.

          Otherwise, I do see your point. The pictures show it as wasted space. Should have used that to increase the size of the 2 flats each side.

          Suggest you write to the freeholder that it IS in fact wasted space and 2 flats pay for a partition, with 3'-0" lockable door with frosted glass ( allows light from external window into stair well ) and partition stops short in height, by 1 foot to allow the detectors in the ceiling to monitor the rest of the landing, and a light between the 2 flats doors.
          THAT is the way to complain. give them an alternative. You never know.

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            #6
            Thanks Milhouse and Hudson. Brutally frank was what I was looking for. Tried to get the whole block to agree to buy the freehold but couldn’t even scrape half of them.

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              #7
              Problem often IME is that it is tenants that will do this sort of thing, as no one tells them what they can and cannot do, they see a space and use it.....this IMO is one of the biggest problems with mixing blocks of flats, leaseholder owner occupiers know the rules, tenants never do and if they do dont care as no one has ever told them. The leaseholder doesnt care cause they dont live there as long as they get their rent thats all that matters

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                #8
                Hit the nail on the head! The issue for managing agents is educating these people, some leaseholders and residents are very proactive and will listen and do as they are told, some bury their head in the hand or ask 'why'?

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