Pet at the flat

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    #16
    Originally posted by jpucng62 View Post
    Bizarre - you buy a property that says 'no pets' and then want a pet! Do you only obey rules & laws that suit you? I thought this was tenant behaviour but it seems owner occupiers are not exempt!
    come on bro there are all sorts of bull **** rules in leases and life actually eg you should tell the police / teacher when someone is causing problems for you. WHat do they do, **** all.

    how many councils say no pets and people have them. be reasonable and sensible please

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      #17
      I am a leaseholder of flats where the leases states no pets, but there are some people with dogs. Personally I dont like having dogs in the communal areas.

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        #18
        The rules are there for the benefit of everyone

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          #19
          It doesn't say no pets, it says "no living creatures" so clearly any human living there is in breach.
          totally unenforceable, ignore it.

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            #20
            Only 20 of 71 flats are occupied and you claim several other owners want pets (perhaps the incoming 50 don't).

            I would be furious if I purchased one of the flats based on a no pets clause and found it was ignored.

            Firstly, flats are unsuitable for animals - unless on the ground floor and even then I would question the soundproofing inside.

            Just imagine if 35 of the 71 flats decided they wanted dogs, cats and god knows what else that may become fashionable - the noise, the stench and (for many) the fear of attack from dogs would turn the place in to a ghetto.

            IF you want pets, then get a house with a garden (and if your pets **** in my garden then be prepared to come and clean it up too).
            My views are my own - you may not agree with them. I tend say things as I see them and I don't do "political correctness". Just because we may not agree you can still buy me a pint lol

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              #21
              Originally posted by Section20z View Post
              totally unenforceable, ignore it.
              I must admit that was my thought too.

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                #22
                Originally posted by Section20z View Post
                It doesn't say no pets, it says "no living creatures" so clearly any human living there is in breach.
                totally unenforceable, ignore it.
                The clause (if quoted accurately in the OP) is poorly written but I'm not convinced that it would so obviously be unenforceable.
                The reasonable interpretation of the meaning, as it would be expected to be understood by both freeholder and leaseholders, would be that it prohibits the keeping of any sort of non-human animal or 'living creature' without the freeholder's consent (so no dogs, cats, reptiles, tarantulas, fish, or anything else that people might wish to keep as pets).

                There is a question of whether or not any 'no pets' clause is really enforceable, but until that is fully tested in the courts I don't see why this one wouldn't be.
                People buying the flats should be aware of the no pets clause before they buy and, as has been said, some people may buy specifically because they expect no pets to be allowed in the block.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by TanyaKTA View Post
                  So are you telling me that when you start a new job and you get given your contracted salary that you expect to earn that the whole time you working there without it to going up ?
                  I was on here for an advice not to be stated the obvious.... thanks for your input
                  Your analogy with a contract of employment would be appropriate, but you need to look at it in a bit more detail:

                  1. You agree certain terms and conditions.
                  2. Both parties (whether employer/employee or freeholder/leaseholder) then need to adhere to the agreement or the other party can take action as a result of the 'breach'.
                  3. The terms of the contract can potentially be changed at the request of either party - but neither party is obligated to agree to any change.

                  If you ask for a pay rise for your job the employer can decline (if the contract doesn't say that you must be given one). You then have to choose whether to accept that you will continue working without a pay rise, will try to negotiate (e.g. agreeing to take on more responsibility in exchange for more pay), will take action that the employer may consider disruptive (and may potentially lead to you being fired), or will search for a new job elsewhere.

                  You now have similar choices: Accept that you can't have a pet, negotiate (e.g. agreeing to cover any extra costs resulting from you having a pet, such as addition cleaning of communal areas), get a dog anyway (and potentially face legal action for breach of lease), or find somewhere to move to that does allow dogs.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Macromia View Post

                    You now have similar choices: Accept that you can't have a pet, negotiate (e.g. agreeing to cover any extra costs resulting from you having a pet, such as addition cleaning of communal areas), get a dog anyway (and potentially face legal action for breach of lease), or find somewhere to move to that does allow dogs.
                    Thank you,

                    Update , some lady from our building have a rabbit and she says she can have it and don't have to ask permission as she own the flat same as us obviously ( i am adding that some flats is renting )
                    we sent email to LL as we don't mind to pay extra service charge for the case of any damage will happens from the Puddle that we want to get (which is funny and ofc never will happens ) but anyways will see .....

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                      #25
                      Rabbit or chicken is ok - 1950 Allotments act s12 says so.
                      I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
                        Rabbit or chicken is ok - 1950 Allotments act s12 says so.
                        I can say chickens is sooooo noisy as we had experience before living next to the neighbours who had a chickens it was a nightmare

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
                          Rabbit or chicken is ok - 1950 Allotments act s12 says so.
                          I think only if the property includes a garden.
                          The Allotments Act 1950 doesn't allow rabbits or chickens to be kept as indoor pets.

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