Alterations context and lease?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Alterations context and lease?

    Hi I have had an offer accepted on a leasehold ground floor maisonette. The property needs quite a lot of work - new bathroom (currently has no shower and an unusable bath), electric shower & socket installation, new kitchen. I'll possibly also install new lighting of hang some shelves.

    I have seen the lease and looked at the clause about alterations. Initially I always thought structural means walls being built or knocked down not plumbing or electrics. Will I need to seek permission before doing any of the above alterations?

    I have also seen the neighbours have a conservatory. Am I right in saying I would need to seek permission from the above resident and the freeholder first before thinking of this?

    Please see the lease part about alterations attached.

    Thanks in advance for any advice

    Screenshot_20210306-183952.jpg

    #2
    I believe "structural alterations" means alterations to internal walls and doors within the demised maisonette. It does not apply to "plumbing and electrics" which are not structural alterations . But your conveyancing solicitor should explain the terms of the lease to you. You are buying a long term rental agreement , not buying the property.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Gordon999 View Post
      I believe "structural alterations" means alterations to internal walls and doors within the demised maisonette. It does not apply to "plumbing and electrics" which are not structural alterations.
      Agreed.

      Originally posted by Gordon999 View Post
      But your conveyancing solicitor should explain the terms of the lease to you.
      Indeed. Hopefully the solicitor is up to the task.

      Originally posted by Gordon999 View Post
      You are buying a long term rental agreement , not buying the property.
      Not really the way to think of it. English land law is not about who owns the land and what is on it (that is simple - the Crown) but what rights you have over it and for how long. Concurrent interests exist. When a long lease is granted at a ground rent the leaseholder has an interest which far exceeds in value the interest of the landlord and an interest which gives him far more rights over the property than the landlord.

      Comment

      Latest Activity

      Collapse

      Working...
      X