Freeholder Roof Maintenance

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    Freeholder Roof Maintenance

    Hello. My flat is rented out - it's a leasehold and managed by a management company on behalf of an investment company who are the freeholder. Recently, while undertaking some other works, the surveyor noticed that the roof was sagging. Further investigation with a structural engineer has revealed that the roof is in a poor condition and the managing agent has decided a whole new roof is required - rafters and all. The other leaseholders and I have no records of any kind of survey or maintenance taking place over the last ten years regarding the roof at all. Our leases quite clearly state that maintenance and upkeep of the roof and timbers is the responsibility of the freeholder. Is there a case to be made (in anyone's experience) that this lack of maintenance (neglect?) has resulted in this situation and therefore it could be worth taking to the tribunal to argue this? Roof sag does not happen over night. If spotted earlier, remedial action could have take place to avoid the huge cost of a new roof which we are now set to pay for? This is my first post - I'd be very grateful for any comments. Apologies if this is in the wrong section. Thanks.

    #2
    Are owners working together ? If so commit to sharing the cost of disputing the charge.
    I think it essential to engage surveyor with leasehold knowledge to advise both on work and responsibility.
    It will cost so I suggest an escrow account to protect interests.

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      #3
      If I am not mistaken you are to have a new roof every 25 years? So it is worth bearing it in mind.

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        #4
        Our roof, Rosemary tiles, is 50 years old and no problems.
        Roof of 2nd property, about 100 years and now having phased replacement.
        Obviously it all depends on roof quality. Counter intuitive but probably the newer the worse condition.
        In younger years lived in a row of 150 year old cottages, no roof replacement or repairs and no problems. New cottages built and within a year needed 're roofing.
        Anecdotal yes but I think revealing.

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          #5
          Quite often roofs sag a bit due to slates being replaced with much heavier tiles. But usually you can get away with accepting the sag and just adding some extra support timbers in the loft to prevent it sagging any further. Does it really need a new roof?

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