Damp in old building with NO DPC

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    Damp in old building with NO DPC

    Hello, Could I ask you for your perspective on damp in old buildings? It seems that new buildings have a DPC (damp proof chemically injected) whilst older buildings dont have them so how do the freeholders manage the repairing obligation for the damp? If there is inherent damp which is part of the building structure then would the freedholder be obligated to repair and maintain or would the ground floor flat under their demise agreement? I understand they are responsible for the plaster but what about the damp when their internal floor is lower than the external ground level?

    #2
    This website may help you know more about damp :

    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-...buildings.html

    Comment


      #3
      Injected chemicals are a workaround for old old buildings with no DPC. Buildings built in what must be getting one for the last 100 years, will have a waterproof layer between courses of bricks. Google "damp proof course" for examples.

      Comment


        #4
        Here is some more information about "ground floor lower than external ground level" :

        https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk...oof_course_DPC

        https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk...n_be_needed.3F



        Comment


          #5
          The primary question is about whether the freeholder has any repair responsibility, not about how to mitigate the problem.

          For a start, the answer will depend on the lease.

          I would tend to expect that the freeholder would have no more responsibility than they would have when the property was built, and presumably it wan't an issue then. However, I'm not certain enough, which is why I didn't answer the main question the first time.

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            #6
            It is complex.
            Was the lease bought in the knowledge it was a damp flat ? Was the price adjusted ? If the Freeholder accepts responsibility and pays it will become a permanent responsibility.
            I suggest sending the issue to LEASE for free qualified legal advice. I have always found them excellent.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Gordon999 View Post
              This website may help you know more about damp :

              https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-...buildings.html
              Thank you Gordon

              Comment


                #8
                leaseholder64,

                I have been learning and becoming aware that very old buildings would not have a damp proof course installed, they did not in those days,the buildings would be made of traditional material designed to breathe...lime plaster breathable paints etc...

                Comment


                  #9
                  Gordon999,

                  Thank you for the links

                  Comment


                    #10
                    scot22,

                    Yes it is complex...the person who bought the flat was not aware of issues, told it has a DPC injected however now transpires only partly done and should not have been done..long story

                    Comment


                      #11
                      leaseholder64,

                      Lease states ...permit the Lessor and each Lessee of a flat in the Building with or without workmen and all persons authorised by any of them at all reasonable times and whenever possible giving seven days notice in writing ( but at any time in case of emergency) during said term to enter upon the Demised Premises or any part thereof for the purpose of repairing or altering any part of the building or executing repairs or alterations to any adjoining or contiguous premises or for the purpose of making repairing maintaining supporting rebuilding cleansing lighting or keeping in good order and condition all roofs foundations damp courses tanks sewers drains pipes cables watercourses gutters wires party or other structures o other conveniences belonging to or serving or used for the building or any part thereof..

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The first cause of action contemplated by section 1(5) includes a cause of action against the builder or developer for failing to see that the work is done so that the dwelling will be fit for habitation. The proviso to section 1(5) says that if "a person who has done work . . . does further work to rectify the work he has already done, any such cause of action in respect of that further work" (my emphasis) accrues when the further work was finished. "Such" cause of action refers back to the words "any cause of action" at the beginning of section 1(5) and, therefore, includes a cause of action for failing to see that the work is done so that the dwelling will be fit for habitation. If that failure still exists after the further work done to rectify the work already done, it is a failure for which the statute gives a remedy and the cause of action in respect of that failure is a cause of action in respect of that further work and accrues when the further work is finished.
                        1. Take the common law position of a house-owner who contracts with a builder to build a house. The builder is obliged to build a house fit for habitation, see Hancock v Brazier [1966] 1 WLR 1317, 1332F per Lord Denning MR. If the house is not fit for habitation because it is damp and if the builder comes to rectify the work that he has done but fails to eliminate the damp because he misdiagnoses the cause of the damp he will be liable for that failure. It would be surprising if, in such circumstances, the house-owner did not have a second cause of action for failure to rectify the work previously done in such a manner that the house will be fit for habitation cf [1966] 1 WLR at page 1325E per Diplock LJ. Whatever the ordinary common law might be, however, there is no doubt that the 1972 Act grants a second cause of action and, on the facts here to be assumed, the second cause of action arises out of the failure properly to rectify work already done, since the damp proof system was not properly rectified despite efforts made to do so. It is, therefore, a "cause of action in respect of that further work" and accrued in May 1995 at the earliest. These proceedings are thus brought in time.

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                          #13
                          Under the terms of your lease, what is the starting date of lease ? who is the lessor ? and who pays of the repairs ?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Stacker View Post

                            Lease states ...permit the Lessor and each Lessee of a flat in the Building with or without workmen and all persons authorised by any of them at all reasonable times and whenever possible giving seven days notice in writing ( but at any time in case of emergency) during said term to enter upon the Demised Premises or any part thereof for the purpose of repairing or altering any part of the building or executing repairs or alterations to any adjoining or contiguous premises or for the purpose of making repairing maintaining supporting rebuilding cleansing lighting or keeping in good order and condition all roofs foundations damp courses tanks sewers drains pipes cables watercourses gutters wires party or other structures o other conveniences belonging to or serving or used for the building or any part thereof..
                            That clause is not relevant. It imposes no obligations on the the freeholder and no financial obligations on the leaseholder.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Gordon999,

                              Lessor is the company run by two directors, no management company

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