Running a business from your property

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    #16
    Some leaseholders never cease to amaze me.

    Is this a block of flats? If they are going to have clients attending the property, the building and the communal areas become a work place and subject to customer access. Ramifications for your fire risk assessment, insurance. Customer has an accident in the common areas. Who is now liable? The leaseholder inviting the customers in will have to have insurances. Will they indemnify you against any incidents? What will the building insurers say. Will they hike the premium?

    Fight it all the way.

    Unless they want to carry out some simple admin and 'run a business', allowing customers in is recepie for disaster.

    Your leaseholder has threatened to fight it in court? Shows the mindset of the person you are dealing with. Get a specialist leasehold lawyers firm, I can recommend some via private message. The insurance premium hike and fees for the FRA renewal you will have to accomodate will land on their doorstep.

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      #17
      It's a thread from over two years ago, resurrected by a spammer.
      I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

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        #18
        Having read this 2 year old thread, I am concerned at the amount of comments in favour , with detailed instructions, ways in which to breach ( or circumnavigate ) the lease.
        Yes, it has been enlightening reading, and realistic problems that will occur if lease is changed, but
        it was the 4th Schedule - Regulations - "Not at any time to use or permit the use of either the Demised Premises or part thereof for business purposes."

        End of story. Permission refused. ( And it is a block of HOMES + not an industrial commercial retail site )

        I would guarentee that the directors ( they are the ones that need to refuse ) would object, should object, and must object, other wise no point in being directors whose job it is to enforce the lease.


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          #19
          Originally posted by ram View Post
          Having read this 2 year old thread, I am concerned at the amount of comments in favour , with detailed instructions, ways in which to breach ( or circumnavigate ) the lease.
          No idea what you've been reading because there's none of that in the comments at all.

          What the comments actually discuss is what the OP should look at in order to be best placed to fight against arguments that running of the stated business from the flat has to be allowed on the grounds of 'reasonableness'.
          This was relevant to the thread because the OP says, in the opening comment, that the leaseholder has said that they will take the issue to court and is asserting that reasonableness now has to be considered. In a situation like this, being able to show the leaseholder that you have good reason to refuse to allow the business (even if reasonableness does have to be considered) may help to avoid it going to court altogether, and being in a position argue that it is reasonable to refuse permission is a sensible fall back position if it did go to court and the court somehow accepted the leaseholder's argument that the outright prohibition shouldn't apply and reasonableness has to be considered.

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            #20
            Too many spammers hitting on this thread.
            I also post as Mars_Mug when not moderating

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