Leasehold storage loft conversion

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    Leasehold storage loft conversion

    Hi,

    I'm planning to convert the loft space in my 2 bedroom maisonette into a storage/study. I got a quote from a loft conversion company and they told me the work will not involve any structural change to the building (e.g. truss removal, etc), even though that includes opening a Velux window. I have already asked the freeholder and he has given me the agreement in general provided that I can provide detailed plans and their approval costs.

    So my question is since I'm not going to do any structural changes to the building do I still need to notify the freeholder? If I do, what's a reasonable price they would ask for as the approval fee, given that they don't need to contract a structural engineer to approve my plan?

    Thanks in advance.







    #2
    Yes. About 2% of the project cost up to £10,000, tapering to 0.25% of the slice above
    £100,000, plus a few hours of the freeholder's time. They ought to be requiring calculations demonstrating that no strengthening is required. Structural changes in leases are not just changes to load bearing structures.

    The window will not be a permitted development, because this is not a house, so you will need full planning consent.

    If you are not already responsible for repairing the roof, they may want the lease varying to reflect possibly higher future costs.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
      Yes. About 2% of the project cost up to £10,000, tapering to 0.25% of the slice above
      £100,000, plus a few hours of the freeholder's time. They ought to be requiring calculations demonstrating that no strengthening is required. Structural changes in leases are not just changes to load bearing structures.

      The window will not be a permitted development, because this is not a house, so you will need full planning consent.

      If you are not already responsible for repairing the roof, they may want the lease varying to reflect possibly higher future costs.
      Thanks for your reply.

      What's the difference between a house and a flat when it comes to opening a roof window? From what I have searched, adding a roof window normally doesn't require a planning permission. Would you mind sending me a link to where you get this information?

      Cheers

      Comment


        #4
        Second paragraph in https://www.planningportal.co.uk/inf...g_permission/2 but also an email from the planning department of my council (in relation to replacing an existing window, not even adding anything new).

        Comment


          #5
          Do you definitely own the loft space?

          Comment


            #6
            Just to confirm about the velux, this is a recent email chain between me and my local council:


            Hi there.
            I live in the top floor flat of a converted house, and own the flat (leasehold).
            Do the same planning rules apply to this as to someone putting a roof window in a house? I can't seem to find this information anywhere.
            Thanks,


            I am afraid a flat has no permitted development rights so you would need planning permission for the roof light

            Thanks
            So the freeholder also has no permitted development rights on the building itself?
            Just to confirm: the house next door that isn't split into flats but is an identical terraced house is able to put a roof window in, but I am not?
            Thanks,


            That is correct

            Comment


              #7
              Please quote in full the lease clause relating to alterations.

              Comment


                #8
                I suggest you personally visit the planning department at your Local Council and talk to the planning officer. Ask if a window in the roof requires planning consent because there may be some relaxation in some situations.

                https://www.planningni.gov.uk/index/..._home_roof.htm

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
                  About 2% of the project cost up to £10,000, tapering to 0.25% of the slice above
                  £100,000, plus a few hours of the freeholder's time.
                  On what basis do you consider that a landlord can charge for complying with an obligation? The L&T Act 1927 only allows "a reasonable sum in respect of [...] any legal or other expenses properly incurred in connection with such licence or consent".

                  Comment


                    #10
                    This is what a surveyor will charge them for checking that the work is done properly. It isn't a premium.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      What about "plus a few hours of the freeholder's time"?

                      Comment

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