Tanking structure of a building

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    Tanking structure of a building

    The walls of a Victorian building converted into flats are not tanked. If you tank the wall of a flat, with the sole intention of preventing any water penetration to that particular flat, does the tanking become part of the structure of the building.

    #2
    The Victorian era covered the period from 1837 to 1901 . The start of building construction with dpc was around 1871-1875 .

    https://www.damp.guide/Dampness_Lies...ALw_wcB#Render

    This website does not think tanking is the permanent solution to prevent water ingress.

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      #3
      It becomes a landlord's fixture. How it affects maintenance responsibilities will depend on the exact wording of the lease.

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        #4
        Thanks for two helpful posts. Gordon the link is much appreciated - the site is a mine of information. I should have said that the flat is on the first floor. I assume the same principles apply. Leaseholder the landlord is a residents management company. Assuming the RMC is not responsible for ensuring all flats are damp free, is this a responsibility they should consider taking on ? If it must, no mention of damp in the lease, then obviously it must there is no choice.

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          #5
          Did you say first floor flat ? Do you have a ground floor flat below and second floor flat above your first floor flat ?

          if you have rain water penetrating inside a first floor flat, you should be looking for gaps in cement course in outer wall which needs re-pointing. and damaged or cracked drain pipe with water spilling out during heavy rain or blocked roof gutter and water overflowing the face of wall.

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