Dealing with damp

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    Dealing with damp

    It is a 19th century building converted into 10 leasehold flats. Three of the flats wish to tank their walls to deal with damp issues. My research is that this could cause more problems in other parts of the building. Are they allowed to do this without permission ?

    #2
    What do you mean by "tank their walls " ? Is this work done inside their own flat ?

    What other problems to other parts of building have you identified ?

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      #3
      Tanking involved putting an impermeable barrier inside the external wall. This obviously will stop by penetrating damp. However from my research this may result in the water going elsewhere in the building. Also damp from condensation will not be able to evaporate through the wall to outside.
      Can they just go ahead and do this ?

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        #4
        Are the 3 flats at ground level ? Are the walls solid 9" brick walls ? The water in the ground or rain water hits the ground and spashes up the side of the building external walls and both may cause moisture penetration through the wall. New buildings will have some pvc band inserted at 6" abnove ground to stop rising dampness.

        If the leaseholders want to cure the damp ingress problem by tanking inside their flat, I think the freeholder cannot object to remedial work ?

        if you believe another part of the building wall is vulnerable to damp ingress. it would already show some signs now ?? .

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          #5
          The concern is that tanking may itself result in problems elsewhere caused by diverting the water to another area.

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            #6
            Which other flats in your building are at lower level in the ground than the 3 flats planning to do tanking ?

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              #7
              Apologies I should have said they are on the second floor. Thanks for taking the time to post.

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                #8
                Sorry to revive thread. Flats on first and second floor. They want Freeholder to pay , not take on responsibility themselves. Freeholder lease obligation is to repair and maintain. Cement mortar pointing in good condition. Is there anything RMC should do ?

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                  #9
                  A 19th century building should probably have lime mortar - which would enable dampness to evaporate rather than penetrate the walls. It's a mistake to replace lime mortar with cement mortar. The freeholder is probably responsible for that mistake.

                  Get a surveyor or a structural engineer to advise you.

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                    #10
                    Thanks for prompt and helpful advice. This has been recommended by a surveyor and freeloader to pay. Don't ask me why but they object to this !

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                      #11
                      Does the 19th Century building have 9in solid brick walls or 11in brick walls with 2in cavity ?

                      Cellar tanking or basement tanking refers to the application of a liquid waterproof coating (tanking slurry) to the walls and floor of a cellar. It is used to treat damp walls by preventing water ingress, effectively making the walls permanently watertight.

                      See www.permaguard.co.uk website


                      Tanking a Shower. ... Essentially it is a waterproof barrier system to protect sensitive substrates in tiled areas such as showers, bathrooms and wet-rooms. The kit consists of a: surface primer.

                      See : https://www.ukbathroomguru.com/tanking-a-shower/



                      If you are near Bristol area , you can get advice on internal wall tanking :

                      https://www.adc-ltd.co.uk/tanking-walls

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                        #12
                        Thanks. It's random stone with rubble infill. Some communal areas experience damp but then dry out. Freeloader wishes to deal with issue by applying modern, breathable barrier externally. One lease holder threatens legal action to stop this work.

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                          #13
                          Your lease should state ( or be read as ) that all faults, damages ( wind, rain, lighting etc ) and repairing obligations to the structure of the building ( including outside walls and roof ) is to be paid by the freeholder, but those costs are recovered from the leaseholders.

                          What do you do if the drive wants replacing, which is not part of the demise of the leaseholders.
                          The freeholder gives a bill to the leaseholders, and gets the job done.
                          If you are an R.M.C. then the leaseholders will be shareholders ( normaly ) and the shareholders are "in effect" owners of the freehold, therefore leaseholders being shareholders must foot the bill.

                          Are you sure there is NO water coming down from the roof ? Blocked gutters, Water ingress via slates not overlapping the gutters. The list is almost endless at gutter roof height water problems..

                          You could always spray that waterproof invisible stuff on the brickworks ( outside ) - It worked for us and no more damp.

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                            #14
                            Many thanks. Company surveyor suggested using external barrier cream made by Sovereign which is breathable. However, one threatened injunction to stop and demands Company pays to tank his flat, a new kitchen and redecoration.

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