Accidental damage (renting via letting agency)

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    Accidental damage (renting via letting agency)

    HI,

    We recently broke the glass top of our cooker and our agency has quoted £200 higher than what the manufacturer themselves quoted us. They said our landlord's insurance doesn't cover accidental damage but given the fact they quoted so high for the repair we have little trust in them. Is there anyway we can get a copy of the landlord's insurance to check ourselves?

    Thanks!

    #2
    Even if the landlord's insurance covers it, their insurers are likely to try to recover the cost from you or your insurers.

    What sort of cooker is this, as £200 price differences sound more than the whole cost of the repair.

    Was this a gas hob damaged by closing it with burners running, as any cooker for which you could do that should have failed the gas safety check.

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      #3
      Thanks! It's a Siemens glass ceramic hob top which is priced at £276 plus £109 for installation (£385). Agency quoted us £585. Damage was caused by a glass spice jar falling from the cupboard above it which is designed to hold spices. It's only cracked on the edge so the hob itself still works. Our contract mentions we liable to replace to the same state it was but also mentions £150 max excess per claim on the landlord's insurance policy.

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        #4
        If it's a fixture, the actual repair is the landlord's responsibility.
        If you are a tenant and broke the hob, you are responsible for the cost of repairing it.
        It wouldn't be something the landlord would want to claim on their insurance (if it's covered, which it probably isn't).

        However, the landlord is obliged to keep their loss to a minimum (technically they are obliged to mitigate their loss).
        So, if it can be repaired (replaced) for £385, the landlord can't demand compensation that's greater than that cost.
        When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
        Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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          #5
          Thank you for all your advice

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            #6
            Are you moving out? If not, and the damage doesn't affect safety, the landlord can only recover the cost when you actually check out, and must take into account the amount of the expected lifetime already used at that stage.

            Is there anything in the tenancy agreement that obliges the landlord to claim on their insurance? Claiming often costs more in the long term.

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              #7
              What are the terms of your repairing obligations? Do they exclude damage covered the landlord's insurance?

              If you are under an obligation to repair you do not need permission to comply with your obligation - just get on and do the repair and ignore the agent.

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                #8
                Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
                Even if the landlord's insurance covers it, their insurers are likely to try to recover the cost from you or your insurers.
                If the damage is covered by insurance which is required by the tenancy agreement, then the insurer doesn't get a subrogated claim against the tenant for the damges, and the tenant should only be liable up to the excess.
                I am not a lawyer, nor am I licensed to provide any regulated advice. None of my posts should be treated as legal or financial advice.

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                  #9
                  KTC,

                  There was a case which confirmed that - don't ask me its name.

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